Most women will get a vaginal yeast infection at some point in their life. Symptoms of vaginal yeast infections include burning, itching, and thick, white discharge. Yeast infections are easy to treat, but it is important to see your doctor or nurse if you think you have an infection. Yeast infection symptoms are similar to other vaginal infections and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). If you have a more serious infection, and not a yeast infection, it can lead to major health problems.
Efforts to prevent infections of the mouth include the use of chlorhexidine mouth wash in those with poor immune function and washing out the mouth following the use of inhaled steroids.[5] Little evidence supports probiotics for either prevention or treatment even among those with frequent vaginal infections.[12][13] For infections of the mouth, treatment with topical clotrimazole or nystatin is usually effective.[5] By mouth or intravenous fluconazole, itraconazole, or amphotericin B may be used if these do not work.[5] A number of topical antifungal medications may be used for vaginal infections including clotrimazole.[14] In those with widespread disease, an echinocandin such as caspofungin or micafungin is used.[15] A number of weeks of intravenous amphotericin B may be used as an alternative.[15] In certain groups at very high risk, antifungal medications may be used preventatively.[11][15]
This is because vaginal infections caused by bacteria, as well as some sexually transmitted infections (STI), may have symptoms very similar to those caused by yeast, but they require different treatments. Since yeast infection treatments have become available over the counter (OTC), many women simply visit the closest drugstore and buy an antifungal cream.
For vaginal yeast infection in pregnancy, topical imidazole or triazole antifungals are considered the therapy of choice owing to available safety data.[58] Systemic absorption of these topical formulations is minimal, posing little risk of transplacental transfer.[58] In vaginal yeast infection in pregnancy, treatment with topical azole antifungals is recommended for 7 days instead of a shorter duration.[58]
Try it: If you’re having recurrent yeast infections and you’re on hormonal birth control, talk to your doctor. They “may try to change the type of birth control to see if that helps,” Dr. Wider says. If you need to change your hormonal birth control for whatever reason and you’re prone to yeast infections, your doctor may recommend a preventative round of fluconazole just to be safe, Dr. Ross says.
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on diaper rash, i have LOVED country comfort baby cream... it works wonders on diaper rash, little scratches, etc. you can get it at whole foods and similar sorts of places. also, the usual info is helpful: exposure to sunlight, etc. if diaper rash is very bad, your baby may have developed thrush (a yeast infection) in the rash area... in which case you'll need to go to the doc for meds. good luck! cynthia

An overgrowth of candida albincans---the fungus responsible for yeast infections---can lead to vaginal yeast infections and also thrush in the breastfeeding mother. Found in the vagina, nipples, mouth and baby's diapered area, candida albicans thrives in moist, dark environments. Though candida albicans is always present in the body, illness, pregnancy or antibiotic use can cause an surplus of this yeast. When a nursing mother develops a yeast infection, chances are this infection will be present in other ares of the body, such as the nipples, which can lead to an infection in baby as well.


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© 2018 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of and/or registration on any portion of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and  Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement  (updated 5/25/18). SELF may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. Your California Privacy Rights.  The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices 
Yeast infections can occur in all age groups, from the very young to the very old. In babies, the most common ailments caused by yeast are diaper rash and a type of fungal infection in the mouth and throat called oral thrush. Rarely, a baby can develop a more serious yeast infection in the bloodstream or other organs. Symptoms depend on the type of infection and range from mild, local irritation to life-threatening illness in rare cases.
Some people find soaking in an apple cider vinegar bath offers relief, as the vinegar can help restore normal acidity to the vagina. Add two cups of vinegar to a shallow warm—not hot—bath, and soak for 15 minutes. Make sure you dry yourself thoroughly before getting dressed. Every body is different, but most women will see some improvement after two or three soaks.
Wait, what? Yes, women can have an imbalance of yeast but not get any yeast infection symptoms. Your doctor may say something about the abundance of yeast after a routine exam or Pap smear, which can leave you confused and alarmed about what’s going on. But as long as you have no symptoms, you don’t need to be concerned or treat it, says Diana Atashroo, MD, a gynecologist at NorthShore University HealthSystem. There’s no reason to take medication your body doesn’t need. Find out the 13 things gynecologists wish their patients knew about yeast infections.
Shino, B., Peedikayil, F. C., Jaiprakash, S. R., Bijapur, G. A., Kottayi, S., & Jose, D. (2016, February 25). Comparison of antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine, coconut oil, probiotics, and ketoconazole on Candida albicans isolated in children with early childhood caries: An in vitro study [Abstract]. Scientifica, 7061587. Retrieved from https://www.hindawi.com/journals/scientifica/2016/7061587/abs/
Vaginal yeast infections are typically treated with topical antifungal agents.[15] A one-time dose of fluconazole is 90% effective in treating a vaginal yeast infection.[56] For severe nonrecurring cases, several doses of fluconazole is recommended.[15] Local treatment may include vaginal suppositories or medicated douches. Other types of yeast infections require different dosing. Gentian violet can be used for thrush in breastfeeding babies. C. albicans can develop resistance to fluconazole, this being more of an issue in those with HIV/AIDS who are often treated with multiple courses of fluconazole for recurrent oral infections.[57]
Researchers believe that certain methods of birth control may be to blame for recurrent yeast infections. Spermicidal jellies and creams increase a woman's susceptibility to infection by altering vaginal flora, allowing candida (yeast microorganisms) to take firmer hold. It seems that the estrogen in oral contraceptives causes the vagina to produce more glycogen (sugar), which feeds the yeast. Vaginal sponges and intrauterine devices (IUDs) may also make you more prone to infection, and diaphragms are thought to promote colonization of candida.
If you've had a yeast infection before and now have the same symptoms—vaginal discharge that has a yeast-like smell,with burning, itching and discomfort—self-treatment with an over-the-counter antifungal treatment is generally acceptable. However, many vaginal infections, including some that can cause serious reproductive health conditions, such as premature birth or increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases, have similar symptoms. If you're not sure, have never had a yeast infection before, are pregnant or have a health condition, consult a health care professional for an evaluation of your symptoms before treating yourself with OTC medications.
In people with weakened immune systems, candidal infections can affect various internal organs and cause pain or dysfunction of the organ. People with suppressed immune systems due to AIDS, chemotherapy, steroids or other conditions may contract a yeast infection called esophagitis in their upper gastrointestinal (GI) systems. This infection is similar to thrush but extends down the mouth and esophagus to the stomach. Candida esophagitis can cause painful ulcers throughout the GI system, making it too painful to swallow even liquids. If the infection spreads into the intestines, food may be poorly absorbed. People with this condition are in danger of becoming dehydrated. There may be associated pain in the area of the sternum (breast bone), pain in the upper abdomen, and/or nausea and vomiting.
The MONISTAT® 7 suite of products is the original prescription formula (100 mg of miconazole nitrate per dose), with smaller doses of the active ingredient evenly distributed throughout the week at bedtime. MONISTAT® 7 meets CDC Treatment Guidelines for pregnant women and is appropriate for women with diabetes. (Consult a healthcare professional before use.) Use as directed.
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