Most experts do not consider yeast infection to be a sexually-transmitted disease, but cases of irritation and itching of the penis in men have been reported after sexual contact with a woman with a yeast infection, so it is possible for an infected woman to spread the infection to her male sex partner. Treatment of male sexual partners is not considered necessary unless the man develops symptoms.

My 8-month old has been getting frequent diaper rashes, too. I just took her to the doctor, and it turns out that her diaper rash is related to thrush, an oral yeast infection that occurs in some nursing babies and appears as white patches in the baby's mouth. It has spread to my nipples and to her stomach, hence the diaper rash. The doctor told me to use Lotrimin on her bum and it went away. If you use cornstarch on it (even the medicated kind), it makes it worse because the cornstarch feeds the yeast. If cornstarch seems to make it worse, your baby may have thrush.
If you’ve got a vagina, you’re at risk of a yeast infection. But that sound a lot more dramatic than it really is. Yeast infections are extremely common, so common that you can buy medication for them over the counter. And because that’s the case, you should probably know a thing or two about recognizing and treating them. Dr. Katherine McHugh — an ob-gyn at Indiana University Health — have a comprehensive overview of everything yeast infection.
Boric acid. Boric acid — a vaginal insert (suppository) available by prescription — may be considered to help treat chronic, less common strains of candida and candida that are resistant to azole medications. Treatment is only vaginal and is applied twice daily for two weeks. However, boric acid can irritate your skin and can be fatal if accidentally ingested, especially by children.
To keep pooch’s ears healthy, regularly check for discharge, odor, and swelling. After your dog bathes or swims, gently dry the outer part of the ears as well as you can. If your dog has hair in the opening of his ears, ask his groomer to trim or tweeze it. You can do it yourself if your dog will let you, but you need to be very careful. Only pluck hairs that are easily visible. Never insert any object into the ear canal unless your vet has shown you how to do it safely. Otherwise, you can damage the ear drum and cause severe problems.
According to the Department of Clinical Research at Merck Research Laboratories, candidiasis can become invasive in cancer patients and present a serious complication. (3) In this study, one-third of patients being treated for cancer had “invasive” candidiasis. Chemotherapy and radiation can both work to kill cancerous cells and tumors; however, they also kill off the healthy bacteria that naturally fight candida.
Contact your doctor as soon as possible if you think your baby has a yeast infection of any type. Seek immediate medical attention if your baby is having difficulty eating. Also contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical care if your baby has a fever or low body temperature, is drowsy or difficult to awaken, or experiences rapid, labored or irregular breathing.
Is it legit? Sure. “Wearing breathable underwear has always been recommended in preventing yeast infections,” Dr. Ross says. “Any type of clothing, including bathing suits or exercise clothing, for extended periods of time can trap unwanted bacteria, chemicals, and sweat, disrupting the pH balance of the vagina and leading to a yeast infection.” Here’s the thing: This won’t cure a yeast infection—it may just help lower the odds you’ll develop one in the first place.
To keep pooch’s ears healthy, regularly check for discharge, odor, and swelling. After your dog bathes or swims, gently dry the outer part of the ears as well as you can. If your dog has hair in the opening of his ears, ask his groomer to trim or tweeze it. You can do it yourself if your dog will let you, but you need to be very careful. Only pluck hairs that are easily visible. Never insert any object into the ear canal unless your vet has shown you how to do it safely. Otherwise, you can damage the ear drum and cause severe problems.
Anti‐fungals are available for oral and intra‐vaginal treatment of uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (thrush). The primary objective of this review was to assess the relative effectiveness of oral versus intra‐vaginal anti‐fungals for the treatment of uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis. The secondary objectives of the review were to assess the cost‐effectiveness, safety and patient preference of oral versus intra‐vaginal anti‐fungals. No statistically significant differences were observed in clinical cure rates of anti‐fungals administered by the oral and intra‐vaginal routes for the treatment of uncomplicated vaginal candidiasis. No definitive conclusion can be made regarding the relative safety of oral and intra‐vaginal anti‐fungals for uncomplicated vaginal candidiasis. The decision to prescribe or recommend the purchase of an anti‐fungal for oral or intra‐vaginal administration should take into consideration: safety, cost and treatment preference. Unless there is a previous history of adverse reaction to one route of administration or contraindications, women who are purchasing their own treatment should be given full information about the characteristics and costs of treatment to make their own decision. If health services are paying the treatment cost, decision‐makers should consider whether the higher cost of some oral anti‐fungals is worth the gain in convenience, if this is the patient's preference.
A 2005 publication noted that "a large pseudoscientific cult"[69] has developed around the topic of Candida, with claims up to one in three people are affected by yeast-related illness, particularly a condition called "Candidiasis hypersensitivity".[70] Some practitioners of alternative medicine have promoted these purported conditions and sold dietary supplements as supposed cures; a number of them have been prosecuted.[71][72] In 1990, alternative health vendor Nature's Way signed an FTC consent agreement not to misrepresent in advertising any self-diagnostic test concerning yeast conditions or to make any unsubstantiated representation concerning any food or supplement's ability to control yeast conditions, with a fine of $30,000 payable to the National Institutes of Health for research in genuine candidiasis.[72]

In addition to symptoms of vaginal yeast infections, such as burning or itching at the labia, a woman may experience sudden nipple pain that lasts through the feeding, or itchy or burning nipples with a candida albicus overgrowth that has also infected the nipples in the form of thrush. Affected nipples may look red, shiny, flaky or even have small blisters. "The Breastfeeding Answer Book" advises to watch for traces of white fungus in the folds of the nipple or breast, or cracked nipples. An infected breast-fed baby may also have white patches on his gums, cheeks, palate or tongue. Also, diaper rash, gassiness or general fussiness are all signs of thrush and that the yeast has spread to the baby.
Good news! If you recognize your symptoms as those of a yeast infection, there are over-the-counter treatments available. Brands like Monistat sell anti-fungal creams and suppositories that can wipe a yeast infection out in one to three days. While there are home remedy ways to help prevent a yeast infection (things like eating yogurt, taking a probiotic and avoiding irritating scents in soaps), McHugh said that by the time you have a yeast infection, you need an actual medication.
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There are plenty of reasons why having a vagina can be great. It can lead to some pretty pleasurable experiences (hey, hey, G-spot orgasms, if that’s a thing your body can do). And, obviously, it often comes with that whole miracle-of-life potential. But there are downsides, too. Enter the dreaded yeast infection: You’re going about your business and suddenly your underwear is covered in a sticky, white residue, or you’re having sex and realize it’s not so much hot as it is burning.

Infant yeast infection should be treated with a topical antifungal medicine such as nystatin four times a day. There are combination antifungal/steroid creams available, but the risk is that overusing steroid cream on sensitive private parts or the face can lead to a thinning out of the skin permanently, with what are called "atrophic changes." It's worth avoiding, and if you can get away with no steroid but just antifungal medicines for yeast infections, that is safer for Junior's bottom.
Non-prescription vaginal creams and suppositories – Common brands are **Monistat, Vagisil, ** and AZO Yeast, which contain ingredients designed to kill yeast upon contact. (Refrain from using condoms as a main form of birth control while on these such regimens, as the ingredients may also weaken latex). Creams are applied topically while suppositories are inserted into the vagina where they dissolve. These medicines can be purchased at any drug store and come in a variety of strengths to lengthen or shorten a treatment period.
To treat thrush in the baby’s mouth, the doctor will prescribe a liquid medication called Nystatin. Follow the package directions to gently rub the medication on your baby’s tongue, cheeks and gums. This is usually done after a feeding, four times a day for two days. If you are using a breast pump, pacifier or bottle nipple, you must boil it for 20 minutes, run it through a dishwasher or use a micro-steam sanitizer each day. Note that boiling may wear down bottle nipples and pacifiers, so you may have to use new ones after one week of boiling.

If your baby has thrush in the diaper area, you need can use the cream (topical treatment). But you need to also use the oral Nystatin suspension. If you don't use the oral suspension, the thrush will often come back. The yeast is in the gut and so comes out with your baby's poop (poo) - if you don't treat from the top end, you won't get cure the thrush.


You can ask your physician for a prescription for Diflucan (fluconazole) if you'd prefer taking a single oral dose of medication over using a vaginal cream or suppository. The drug is appropriate for uncomplicated cases and had only mild to moderate side effects—including headache, dizziness, diarrhea, heartburn, and stomach pain—in clinical trials. However, oral fluconazole should not be taken if you are pregnant, as it can cause birth defects.
The most telltale sign of a yeast infection is thick, white, odor-free vaginal discharge, which is often described as looking like cottage cheese. It may or may not be accompanied by watery discharge as well. Sounds confusing? This is why it’s so important to know what’s normal for you and your vag. Some women naturally have more vaginal fluids than others so if yours changes suddenly—in color, amount, or odor—it’s time to get it checked out, Ghodsi says.
Infant yeast infection should be treated with a topical antifungal medicine such as nystatin four times a day. There are combination antifungal/steroid creams available, but the risk is that overusing steroid cream on sensitive private parts or the face can lead to a thinning out of the skin permanently, with what are called "atrophic changes." It's worth avoiding, and if you can get away with no steroid but just antifungal medicines for yeast infections, that is safer for Junior's bottom.

© 2018 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of and/or registration on any portion of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and  Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement  (updated 5/25/18). SELF may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. Your California Privacy Rights.  The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices 
Yeast infections can occur in all age groups, from the very young to the very old. In babies, the most common ailments caused by yeast are diaper rash and a type of fungal infection in the mouth and throat called oral thrush. Rarely, a baby can develop a more serious yeast infection in the bloodstream or other organs. Symptoms depend on the type of infection and range from mild, local irritation to life-threatening illness in rare cases.
Many girls find that yeast infections tend to show up right before they get their periods because of the hormonal changes that come with the menstrual cycle. Clothing (especially underwear) that's tight or made of materials like nylon that trap heat and moisture might make yeast infections more likely. Using scented sanitary products and douching can upset the healthy balance of bacteria in the vagina and make yeast infections more likely.

It’s no wonder why you might not want to head to the doctor to treat a yeast infection. Waiting to see the doctor can extend your itchy vagina experience, and actually following through with the appointment can be time-consuming. Plus, isn’t that the entire point of all those at-home yeast infection treatments at the drugstore? We spoke with ob/gyns to find out: When the going gets cottage cheesy, is it OK to just treat a yeast infection at home?


One-fourth to one-half of babies experience diaper rash. Of these, 15%-50% are due to yeast. Yeast diaper rashes tend to decrease as children get older and end when the infant stops using diapers. The air exposure afforded by underwear lessens the establishment of an infection on macerated skin surfaces. This explains the tongue-in-cheek opinion of pediatricians that a quick cure for diaper rash (contact or infectious) is successful toilet training.
If your baby has thrush in the diaper area, you need can use the cream (topical treatment). But you need to also use the oral Nystatin suspension. If you don't use the oral suspension, the thrush will often come back. The yeast is in the gut and so comes out with your baby's poop (poo) - if you don't treat from the top end, you won't get cure the thrush.
Your doctor or nurse can also give you a single dose of antifungal medicine taken by mouth, such as fluconazole (floo-CON-uh-zohl). If you get more than four vaginal yeast infections a year, or if your yeast infection doesn't go away after using over-the-counter treatment, you may need to take regular doses of antifungal medicine for up to six months.
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