Vaginal candidiasis is common. In the United States, it is the second most common type of vaginal infection after bacterial vaginal infections.2 More research is needed to determine the number of women who are affected and how many have vaginal candidiasis that keeps coming back after getting better (more than three times per year). The number of cases of vaginal candidiasis in the United States is difficult to determine because there is no national surveillance for this infection. Vaginal candidiasis can be more frequent in people with weakened immune systems.
Candida species can be present in healthy women in the vagina without causing any symptoms. In fact, it is estimated that 20% to 50% of women have Candida already present in the vagina. For an infection to occur, the normal balance of yeast and bacteria is disturbed, allowing overgrowth of the yeast. While yeast can be spread by sexual contact, vaginal yeast infection is not considered to be a sexually-transmitted disease because it can also occur in women who are not sexually active, due to the fact that yeast can be present in the vagina of healthy women.
Symptoms of vaginal candidiasis are also present in the more common bacterial vaginosis;[45] aerobic vaginitis is distinct and should be excluded in the differential diagnosis.[46] In a 2002 study, only 33% of women who were self-treating for a yeast infection actually had such an infection, while most had either bacterial vaginosis or a mixed-type infection.[47]
Respiratory, gastrointestinal, and esophageal candidiasis require an endoscopy to diagnose.[23][49] For gastrointestinal candidiasis, it is necessary to obtain a 3–5 milliliter sample of fluid from the duodenum for fungal culture.[23] The diagnosis of gastrointestinal candidiasis is based upon the culture containing in excess of 1,000 colony-forming units per milliliter.[23]

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Your vagina likes to be in balance. If you get an overgrowth of the fungus candida down there, you may get a yeast infection. It’s incredibly common—three-quarters of women will get saddled with one in their lifetime—but pregnancy, uncontrolled diabetes, hormonal birth control, douching or using other vaginal cleansing products, and taking antibiotics can make you more susceptible to them, according to the federal Office on Women’s Health.

To treat a yeast diaper rash, you doctor will prescribe an ointment that you will apply to the diaper area at least four times a day for two weeks. You should also try not to use diaper wipes from stores. Instead, use clear water and non-scented tissues or washcloths and pat dry. Soaking the diaper area in warm water for 5 to 10 minutes, four times a day, and then letting your baby’s bottom air dry, can also be soothing for your baby.


Yeast infections are usually caused by an overgrowth of a type of fungus called Candida, also known as yeast. Small amounts of yeast and other organisms are normally found in your vagina, as well as in your mouth and digestive tract. Yeast infections occur when the balance of organisms in your vagina is upset, and the amount of yeast grows too much, causing an infection. Yeast infections are most likely to be noticeable just before or just after your menstrual period. Some types of “yeast” infections are harder to treat and are caused by other species. Ask your health care provider (HCP) if you should be checked for the other types if your symptoms do not get better.

Try it: You can generally buy these online or at your local pharmacy. Like OTC vaginal yeast infection medications, you simply insert them vaginally, often for 14 days in a row, Dr. Ross says. This “has been an effective alternative to traditional medication,” she adds. However, it’s worth pointing out that these suppositories can irritate your skin.
The healthy vaginal ecosystem requires just the right balance of bacteria flora. The vaginal mucosa, which protects against pathogens, is made up predominantly of healthy bacteria called lactobacillus. These bacteria make hydrogen peroxide, which keeps unhealthy bacteria from getting out of hand. This, in turn, keeps the amount of yeast at a normal level. Too much douching can disrupt the bacterial balance and lead to infection.

Treatment is equally as simple. If you’ve had yeast infections in the past and are sure this is what the problem is, it’s fine to try an over-the-counter medication, Ghodsi says. However, it’s probably worth checking in with your doc. Not only can they screen you for other problems, but if it really is a yeast infection they can prescribe you a stronger, faster-acting medication, she adds.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Wang ZK, Yang YS, Stefka AT, Sun G, Peng LH (April 2014). "Review article: fungal microbiota and digestive diseases". Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. 39 (8): 751–766. doi:10.1111/apt.12665. PMID 24612332. In addition, GI fungal infection is reported even among those patients with normal immune status. Digestive system-related fungal infections may be induced by both commensal opportunistic fungi and exogenous pathogenic fungi. The IFI in different GI sites have their special clinical features, which are often accompanied by various severe diseases. Although IFI associated with digestive diseases are less common, they can induce fatal outcomes due to less specificity of related symptoms, signs, endoscopic and imaging manifestations, and the poor treatment options. ... Candida sp. is also the most frequently identified species among patients with gastric IFI. ... Gastric IFI is often characterised by the abdominal pain and vomiting and with the endoscopic characteristics including gastric giant and multiple ulcers, stenosis, perforation, and fistula. For example, gastric ulcers combined with entogastric fungal infection, characterised by deep, large and intractable ulcers,[118] were reported as early as the 1930s. ... The overgrowth and colonisation of fungi in intestine can lead to diarrhoea.
It can be hard to tell if this is the problem because the patches in her mouth can be very small and the only symptom thrush nipples have had for me is that they get dry. She was prescribed nystatin suspension drops and I put Lotrimin on my nipples. We have been fighting thrush for a while, now, as it is VERY hard to get rid of. If my nipples are dry, I know that it has spread to me. You have to boil EVERYTHING that comes into contact with the baby's mouth. We use clothe diapers, and she hasn't gotten any more diaper rashes since I started using Lotrimin on her bum. I still don't know if we've gotten rid of the thrush, but we are still in treatment mode and I'm boiling everything AGAIN... Anonymous
This is because vaginal infections caused by bacteria, as well as some sexually transmitted infections (STI), may have symptoms very similar to those caused by yeast, but they require different treatments. Since yeast infection treatments have become available over the counter (OTC), many women simply visit the closest drugstore and buy an antifungal cream.
If you suspect that you’re struggling with a vaginal yeast infection, you can use over-the-counter antifungal medication to try to clear it up, Dr. Wider says. But if that doesn’t do the trick or you think you’re struggling with recurrent yeast infections, talk to your ob/gyn. They can do a vaginal culture to confirm that you do, in fact, have a yeast infection and recommend next steps from there.

No matter what you do, or what you feed them, sometimes babies get diaper rashes. One of the more painful types is a yeast infection rash. We've all got yeast in our bodies, but just like many things, sometimes normal processes get out of whack and create issues. Yeast rashes suck and make big red patches with lots of spots. It spreads out into folds and looks painful (and often is). Yeast infections can happen to boys as well. Your pediatrician might tell you to go to the lady's section at the store and grab some of the same cream you'd use if you had the dreaded yeast infection, but there are a lot of other natural, tried-and-true ways to help treat it at home without meds.
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Even though the signs and symptoms of yeast infection may point to the cause, vaginal itching and discharge can be caused by other conditions including bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas infections. To most accurately make the diagnosis, a sample of the discharge is tested in the laboratory, either by culture or by direct examination under a microscope, to identify the yeast organisms and to help rule out other causes such as bacterial vaginosis or sexually-transmitted diseases.
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