For severe or frequent Candida vaginal yeast infections, a doctor may prescribe two to three doses of Diflucan given 72 hours apart. Another oral medication that can be used in these cases is Nizoral (ketoconazole), which is taken for seven to 14 days, either once or twice daily, depending on your physician's recommendations. Women with diabetes may need this longer course of treatment to clear the infection.

Candida is a fungus that occurs naturally in the vagina at low levels without issue, but in large numbers, it can lead to the uncomfortable symptoms of a yeast infection, like irritation of the vulva and vaginal opening, a burning sensation during sex or while peeing, a vulvar or vaginal rash, and a thick, lumpy discharge that resembles cottage cheese. (Keep in mind that you may not always have all of these symptoms.)


Antibiotic treatment. Babies exposed to antibiotic treatment (even if the nursing mother is consuming antibiotics) are more prone to develop yeast infection. The reason is that consumption of antibiotic kill good bacteria (besides the disease causing bacteria) present in body that keeps the excessive yeast growth in check. In the absence of good bacteria, yeast can grow excessively.
Yeast infections are usually caused by an overgrowth of a type of fungus called Candida, also known as yeast. Small amounts of yeast and other organisms are normally found in your vagina, as well as in your mouth and digestive tract. Yeast infections occur when the balance of organisms in your vagina is upset, and the amount of yeast grows too much, causing an infection. Yeast infections are most likely to be noticeable just before or just after your menstrual period. Some types of “yeast” infections are harder to treat and are caused by other species. Ask your health care provider (HCP) if you should be checked for the other types if your symptoms do not get better.

Contact your doctor as soon as possible if you think your baby has a yeast infection of any type. Seek immediate medical attention if your baby is having difficulty eating. Also contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical care if your baby has a fever or low body temperature, is drowsy or difficult to awaken, or experiences rapid, labored or irregular breathing.
Such a diaper rash can begin with softening and breakdown of the tissue around the anus. The infected area is red and elevated, and fluid may be visible under the skin. Small, raised infected red bumps (satellite pustules) appear at the periphery of the rash. These satellite pustules are characteristic of Candida diaper rash and allow yeast diaper rash to be easily distinguished from other types of diaper rash such as a contact (irritant) diaper rash. Yeast diaper rash can appear on the thighs, genital creases, abdomen, and genitals.
“If you've been clinically diagnosed by a physician with a yeast infection on ... prior occasions, and the symptoms that you have are consistent with the symptoms that you had before, I do think that it's reasonable to try some of these over-the-counter remedies,” Chantel Cross, M.D., assistant professor of gynecology and obstetrics at Johns Hopkins Medicine, tells SELF.
Applying plain yogurt to the area may help to restore balance and reduce irritation. Using only plain yogurt with active cultures, once or twice a day, rub a few tablespoons’ worth around the outside of the vagina to quell irritation, or insert the same amount into the vagina. You can also dip a tampon in the yogurt, let it soak for a few minutes, and then insert it.
Women with VVC usually experience genital itching, burning, and sometimes a "cottage cheese-like" vaginal discharge. Men with genital candidiasis may experience an itchy rash on the penis. The symptoms of VVC are similar to those of many other genital infections, so it is important to see your doctor if you have any of these symptoms...Read more about Genital Candidiasis Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

If you need to take antibiotics, you may wind up with a yeast infection. The use of antibiotics will frequently tip the balance among the normal microorganisms of the vagina, allowing harmful bacteria to dominate vaginal flora. Antibiotics suppress the growth of protective vaginal bacteria, which normally have an antifungal effect. Before rushing to the drugstore for an over-the-counter treatment, it's wise to consult your health care professional. Many self-diagnosed yeast infections turn out to be other vaginal problems.
Every woman’s vagina has a delicate balance of live bacteria and yeast cells. When this balance is thrown off, yeast cells can multiply, which often leads to a yeast infection. Yeast infections can develop because of lifestyle habits, environmental changes, skin-to-skin contact with someone that has a yeast infection, health conditions such as diabetes, and even other cyclical changes in a woman’s body.
Your genital health can be a sensitive subject. You should only opt out of treatment if you have experienced a yeast infection before and are comfortable with your body’s response, or if your symptoms are very mild. Even in these cases, it is best to be cautious and ask your doctor about your yeast infection and how you should treat it. The sooner you know, the sooner you can get back to a healthy life.
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Infant yeast infection should be treated with a topical antifungal medicine such as nystatin four times a day. There are combination antifungal/steroid creams available, but the risk is that overusing steroid cream on sensitive private parts or the face can lead to a thinning out of the skin permanently, with what are called "atrophic changes." It's worth avoiding, and if you can get away with no steroid but just antifungal medicines for yeast infections, that is safer for Junior's bottom.
Yeast infection is treated using antifungal drugs. Both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) remedies are available that are effective in treating vaginal yeast infections. Nonprescription drugs are the best home remedy for yeast infections, and they can cure most yeast infections. However, homeopathic methods have not been adequately studied for doctors and other health care professionals to recommend them, and anti-itch medications treat only the itching symptoms, but do not treat the underlying cause (yeast infection).
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