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A yeast infection is simply an overgrowth of candida, a fungus found naturally in your vagina, says Pari Ghodsi, M.D., an ob-gyn and women’s health expert practicing in LA. A fungus? In your lady bits? Yep, it’s all part of the delicate microbiome of organisms that keeps things running smoothly downstairs. When all is working properly, the bacteria in your vagina keep the fungus in check, but if something throws off the balance you can end up with an overgrowth of bacteria (bacterial vaginosis) or candida (a yeast infection), she explains.

If you see a health care professional, he or she may prescribe a single dose of oral fluconazole (Diflucan) or a generic equivalent, although this treatment is not recommended during pregnancy. Also, do not take fluconazole if you are taking cisapride (Propulsid) because this drug combination could cause serious, even fatal, heart problems. There have been reported drug interactions between warfarin, an anticoagulant (blood thinner) medication, and topical miconazole nitrate products (such as Monistat) and oral fluconazole (Diflucan). Additionally, fluconazole may cause liver damage in rare instances, particularly in conjunction with alcohol use. Discuss all the medications you may be taking when you discuss your symptoms with your health care professional.

All of these types of medicine can clear up your symptoms in a couple of days and cure the infection within a week. It's important that you take the medicine for the whole time that your doctor prescribes. If you stop taking it too soon, the infection could come back. If you're not feeling better within a few days of finishing treatment, call your doctor.
Every woman’s vagina has a delicate balance of live bacteria and yeast cells. When this balance is thrown off, yeast cells can multiply, which often leads to a yeast infection. Yeast infections can develop because of lifestyle habits, environmental changes, skin-to-skin contact with someone that has a yeast infection, health conditions such as diabetes, and even other cyclical changes in a woman’s body.

When my son had oral yeast (thrush) and several weeks of Nystatin did nothing for it, we used Gentian Violet, which is cheap ($3/bottle) and available at most drug stores, and it cured him in two days. You only need a drop or two. If your daughter's diaper rash is indeed yeast (which it might not be), perhaps Gentian Violet would help. Note that it stains everything it touches bright purple, so be prepared with some clothes you don't care about! Purple and Yeast-Free
A yeast infection results from an overgrowth of yeast (a type of fungus) anywhere in the body. Candidiasis is by far the most common type of yeast infection. There are more than 20 species of Candida, the most common being Candida albicans. These fungi live on all surfaces of our bodies. Under certain conditions, they can become so numerous they cause infections, particularly in warm and moist areas. Examples of such infections are vaginal yeast infections, thrush (infection of tissues of the oral cavity), skin, including diaper rash, beneath large breasts, and nailbed infections.
Candida organisms naturally live on the skin, but breakdown of the outer layers of skin promote the yeast's overgrowth. This typically occurs when the environment is warm and moist such as in diaper areas and skin folds. Superficial candida skin infections appear as a red flat rash with sharp scalloped edges. There are usually smaller patches of similar appearing rash nearby, known as "satellite lesions." These rashes may cause itching or pain.
First and foremost, if you're a nursing mom, squirt that breast milk on baby's butt! Whether straight from the tap, or if you'd rather pump and get it on there some other way, those antibodies even help kill bacteria topically (great for ear infections, cuts, sinuses, all sorts of things!). I know it seems really super-weird, but I swear, it's helpful.
Boric acid. Boric acid — a vaginal insert (suppository) available by prescription — may be considered to help treat chronic, less common strains of candida and candida that are resistant to azole medications. Treatment is only vaginal and is applied twice daily for two weeks. However, boric acid can irritate your skin and can be fatal if accidentally ingested, especially by children.
If you suspect that you’re struggling with a vaginal yeast infection, you can use over-the-counter antifungal medication to try to clear it up, Dr. Wider says. But if that doesn’t do the trick or you think you’re struggling with recurrent yeast infections, talk to your ob/gyn. They can do a vaginal culture to confirm that you do, in fact, have a yeast infection and recommend next steps from there.
The Center for Young Women’s Health (CYWH) is a collaboration between the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine and the Division of Gynecology at Boston Children’s Hospital. The Center is an educational entity that exists to provide teen girls and young women with carefully researched health information, health education programs, and conferences.
The vagina always contains small amounts of yeast. When you’re healthy, that yeast (technically, a fungus known as Candida albicans) exists in harmony with your immune system and your other normal vaginal microorganisms. But when something disrupts this balance, the yeast can grow quickly, becoming dense enough to cause the symptoms of a full-blown infection.
Such a diaper rash can begin with softening and breakdown of the tissue around the anus. The infected area is red and elevated, and fluid may be visible under the skin. Small, raised infected red bumps (satellite pustules) appear at the periphery of the rash. These satellite pustules are characteristic of Candida diaper rash and allow yeast diaper rash to be easily distinguished from other types of diaper rash such as a contact (irritant) diaper rash. Yeast diaper rash can appear on the thighs, genital creases, abdomen, and genitals.
To treat thrush in the baby’s mouth, the doctor will prescribe a liquid medication called Nystatin. Follow the package directions to gently rub the medication on your baby’s tongue, cheeks and gums. This is usually done after a feeding, four times a day for two days. If you are using a breast pump, pacifier or bottle nipple, you must boil it for 20 minutes, run it through a dishwasher or use a micro-steam sanitizer each day. Note that boiling may wear down bottle nipples and pacifiers, so you may have to use new ones after one week of boiling.
Oral thrush: All you need to know Oral thrush is typically caused by a fungal infection that develops on the mucous membranes of the mouth. Symptoms include creamy or white deposits in the mouth. Treatment usually involves antifungal drugs, but some home remedies might help reduce the risk of the thrush worsening. Read about types and risk factors. Read now
Candidiasis is a fungal infection due to any type of Candida (a type of yeast).[2] When it affects the mouth, it is commonly called thrush.[2] Signs and symptoms include white patches on the tongue or other areas of the mouth and throat.[3] Other symptoms may include soreness and problems swallowing.[3] When it affects the vagina, it is commonly called a yeast infection.[2] Signs and symptoms include genital itching, burning, and sometimes a white "cottage cheese-like" discharge from the vagina.[8] Yeast infections of the penis are less common and typically present with an itchy rash.[8] Very rarely, yeast infections may become invasive, spreading to other parts of the body.[9] This may result in fevers along with other symptoms depending on the parts involved.[9]
A yeast infection commonly appears in the skin folds where it is warm and moist. Other common names are a fungal infection or Candida albicans. It usually presents as a swollen red rash with white scales and lesions. They may also appear as small white pus-filled lesions surrounded by redness. In addition to the skin folds, lesions may be found on nearby skin outside the diaper area, such as the thighs or abdomen. These are called satellite lesions, and are usually a common sign of the yeast infection.
For most girls, there's no way to prevent yeast infections. Girls may feel more comfortable and have less irritation if they wear breathable cotton underwear and loose clothes and avoid vaginal sprays and douches. But there's no scientific proof that doing these things prevents yeast infections. If your daughter has diabetes, keeping her blood sugar levels under control will help her avoid getting yeast infections.
Yeast infections occur without sexual activity and, therefore, are not considered sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, yeast can be transferred between sexual partners through vaginal, oral, or anal sex. You can use a condom or dental dam to protect against this. If your sexual activity irritates the vagina, it can disrupt the normal balance and encourage an overgrowth of yeast.

You’ve been potty trained since you were a toddler, but if you find yourself avoiding using the bathroom because it hurts to pee, you’ve likely got a much more adult problem. Pain during urination is one of the signs of not only yeast infections but also urinary tract infections and some sexually transmitted diseases. If this is your main symptom, get it checked by your doctor asap, she says.
A yeast diaper rash is a common  rash that develops on the bums of babies and young toddlers. “It’s very normal in infants and toddlers,” says Natasha Burgert, MD, FAAP, pediatrician at Pediatrics Associates in Kansas City, Missouri. “Yeast is a fungus that lives on your skin and in the intestines, and when you have a warm, moist environment in the diaper area, it can cause a bit of a rash.”

Caregivers can reduce yeast in the vaginal area by keeping the area clean and dry. This may not be enough to cure the infection but it is important in fighting it and preventing future infections. Always wipe the baby from front to back to keep infectious agents found in feces away from the vagina. This not only includes yeast but also harmful bacteria. Keep the baby as dry as possible by changing soiled diapers often. Bathe the baby in a warm bath with two to three tablespoons of baking soda or colloidal oatmeal to reduce irritation caused by the yeast infection.
Medications in vaginal creams (such as clotrimazole and miconazole) may also be available as vaginal tablets or suppositories. You put these into your vagina and let them dissolve. Some brands call them "ovules" because they're oval-shaped. These products often come packaged with a plastic "inserter" that helps you get the medication to the right place.
Some women get yeast infections every month around the time of their menstrual periods. Your health care provider may tell you that you need to take medicine every month to prevent yeast infections. This is done to stop the symptoms from developing, or if you get a lot of infections you may be told that you need to take oral pills for up to 6 months. Never self-treat unless you’ve talked to your health care provider.
As with any food, however, it’s always important to monitor how you feel after consuming a meal when you have candida. Some people who suffer stomach distress after eating any kind of starch, for instance, should avoid starchy vegetables like corn, peas, parsnips, potatoes, pumpkin, squash, zucchini and yams. Instead, they should eat non-starchy vegetables — typically the flowering parts of the plant — like lettuce, asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, spinach, mushrooms, onions, peppers and tomatoes.
Genital yeast infection in men: Men may develop symptoms of a genital yeast infection after intercourse with a woman who has a vaginal yeast infection. However, yeast infection is not considered to be a sexually-transmitted disease (STD) because women can have the yeast normally in the body and do not acquire it from an outside source. Most experts do not recommend treatment of male sex partners of women with candida yeast infection unless they develop symptoms. Symptoms can include itching and burning of the penis as well as a rash on the skin of the penis.
Over-the-counter antifungal creams, ointments or suppositories (with miconazole or clotrimazole) are the most common ways to treat yeast infections. These can take from 1 to 7 days. Your doctor may also prescribe a single-dose pill with fluconazole (an antifungal medicine) for you to take. If you’re pregnant, it’s safe to use creams or suppositories, but not the fluconazole you take by mouth.
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