The fungus candida causes a vaginal yeast infection. Your vagina naturally contains a balanced mix of yeast, including candida, and bacteria. Lactobacillus bacteria produce acid, which prevents yeast overgrowth. That balance can be disrupted and lead to a yeast infection. Too much yeast in your vagina causes vaginal itching, burning and other classic signs and symptoms of a yeast infection.
To treat thrush in the baby’s mouth, the doctor will prescribe a liquid medication called Nystatin. Follow the package directions to gently rub the medication on your baby’s tongue, cheeks and gums. This is usually done after a feeding, four times a day for two days. If you are using a breast pump, pacifier or bottle nipple, you must boil it for 20 minutes, run it through a dishwasher or use a micro-steam sanitizer each day. Note that boiling may wear down bottle nipples and pacifiers, so you may have to use new ones after one week of boiling.
Essential oils should not be taken orally. They are meant to be inhaled as part of aromatherapy. While some studies are examining other ways to use oregano essential oils, at this time it’s recommended that you use it diluted in a carrier oils, such as olive or sweet almond oil. Mix three to five drops essential oil per ounce of carrier oil. Then, apply it to the skin in massage or inhale it through a diffuser. Do not apply essential oils near your vagina.
Take antibiotics only when prescribed by your health care professional and never for longer than directed. In addition to destroying bacteria that cause illness, antibiotics kill off the "good" bacteria that keep the yeast in the vagina at a normal level. If you tend to get yeast infections whenever you take an antibiotic, ask your doctor to prescribe a vaginal antifungal agent at the same time.
^ Jump up to: a b c Pappas, PG; Kauffman, CA; Andes, DR; Clancy, CJ; Marr, KA; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L; Reboli, AC; Schuster, MG; Vazquez, JA; Walsh, TJ; Zaoutis, TE; Sobel, JD (16 December 2015). "Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America". Clinical Infectious Diseases: civ933. doi:10.1093/cid/civ933. PMC 4725385. PMID 26679628.

Signs and symptoms of candidiasis vary depending on the area affected.[17] Most candidal infections result in minimal complications such as redness, itching, and discomfort, though complications may be severe or even fatal if left untreated in certain populations. In healthy (immunocompetent) persons, candidiasis is usually a localized infection of the skin, fingernails or toenails (onychomycosis), or mucosal membranes, including the oral cavity and pharynx (thrush), esophagus, and the genitalia (vagina, penis, etc.);[18][19][20] less commonly in healthy individuals, the gastrointestinal tract,[21][22][23] urinary tract,[21] and respiratory tract[21] are sites of candida infection.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
×