Jump up ^ Mendling W, Brasch J (2012). "Guideline vulvovaginal candidosis (2010) of the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics, the Working Group for Infections and Infectimmunology in Gynecology and Obstetrics, the German Society of Dermatology, the Board of German Dermatologists and the German Speaking Mycological Society". Mycoses. 55 Suppl 3: 1–13. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0507.2012.02185.x. PMID 22519657.
Vaginal yeast infection, also known as candidal vulvovaginitis and vaginal thrush, is excessive growth of yeast in the vagina that results in irritation.[5][1] The most common symptom is vaginal itching, which may be severe.[1] Other symptoms include burning with urination, white and thick vaginal discharge that typically does not smell bad, pain with sex, and redness around the vagina.[1] Symptoms often worsen just before a woman's period.[2]
Some people find soaking in an apple cider vinegar bath offers relief, as the vinegar can help restore normal acidity to the vagina. Add two cups of vinegar to a shallow warm—not hot—bath, and soak for 15 minutes. Make sure you dry yourself thoroughly before getting dressed. Every body is different, but most women will see some improvement after two or three soaks.
That said, you can still see a doctor for confirmation of your yeast infection even if you’ve had one diagnosed in the past. In general, people don’t seem to be particularly good at self-diagnosing their vaginal health issues. A 2010 study of 546 people published in Nursing Research found that study participants with yeast infections misdiagnosed themselves around 30 percent of the time, and those with bacterial vaginosis or the sexually transmitted infection trichomoniasis misdiagnosed themselves around 44 percent of the time. A lot of these conditions can share the same symptoms, so it’s not your fault if you can’t always tell them apart. So, if you’re at all unsure, see a doctor.

Maintenance plan. For recurrent yeast infections, your doctor might recommend a medication routine to prevent yeast overgrowth and future infections. Maintenance therapy starts after a yeast infection is cleared with treatment. You may need a longer treatment of up to 14 days to clear the yeast infection before beginning maintenance therapy. Therapies may include a regimen of oral fluconazole tablets once a week for six months. Some doctors prescribe clotrimazole as a vaginal suppository used once a week instead of an oral medication.
Mouth and throat candidiasis are treated with antifungal medication. Oral candidiasis usually responds to topical treatments; otherwise, systemic antifungal medication may be needed for oral infections. Candidal skin infections in the skin folds (candidal intertrigo) typically respond well to topical antifungal treatments (e.g., nystatin or miconazole). Systemic treatment with antifungals by mouth is reserved for severe cases or if treatment with topical therapy is unsuccessful. Candida esophagitis may be treated orally or intravenously; for severe or azole-resistant esophageal candidiasis, treatment with amphotericin B may be necessary.[5]

A Candida skin infection can come from the upper gastrointestinal tract, the lower gastrointestinal tract, or exposure from a care provider. A Candida diaper rash can be accompanied by Candida infection of the mouth (thrush). A breastfeeding infant with a thrush infection may inadvertently infect the mother's nipple/areola area. If such an infection is suspected, simple topical medications may be prescribed by her doctor.

Azole medications are a family of antifungal drugs that end in the suffix "-azole." They block the manufacture of ergosterol, a crucial material of the yeast cell wall. Without ergosterol, the yeast cell wall becomes leaky and the yeast die. Fortunately, ergosterol is not a component of human membranes, and azoles do not harm human cells. Examples include miconazole, tioconazole, clotrimazole, fluconazole, and butoconazole.
Hydrogen peroxide is a bacteria and yeast-killing antiseptic, according to lab studies. While it won’t work on every species of yeast, some women swear by using hydrogen peroxide topically when they get a yeast infection. Make sure that you dilute hydrogen peroxide before applying it to your genitals, and don’t use it for more than five days in a row.
Wait, what? Yes, women can have an imbalance of yeast but not get any yeast infection symptoms. Your doctor may say something about the abundance of yeast after a routine exam or Pap smear, which can leave you confused and alarmed about what’s going on. But as long as you have no symptoms, you don’t need to be concerned or treat it, says Diana Atashroo, MD, a gynecologist at NorthShore University HealthSystem. There’s no reason to take medication your body doesn’t need. Find out the 13 things gynecologists wish their patients knew about yeast infections.
When my son had oral yeast (thrush) and several weeks of Nystatin did nothing for it, we used Gentian Violet, which is cheap ($3/bottle) and available at most drug stores, and it cured him in two days. You only need a drop or two. If your daughter's diaper rash is indeed yeast (which it might not be), perhaps Gentian Violet would help. Note that it stains everything it touches bright purple, so be prepared with some clothes you don't care about! Purple and Yeast-Free

How long does a yeast infection take to go away? Vaginal yeast infections are common and the result of an imbalance of bacteria in the vagina. How long vaginal yeast infections last can vary, depending on their severity and what treatment is used. Learn more about what to expect and home remedies that may be worth trying to treat the infection and ease the symptoms. Read now


Most women will get a vaginal yeast infection at some point in their life. Symptoms of vaginal yeast infections include burning, itching, and thick, white discharge. Yeast infections are easy to treat, but it is important to see your doctor or nurse if you think you have an infection. Yeast infection symptoms are similar to other vaginal infections and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). If you have a more serious infection, and not a yeast infection, it can lead to major health problems.

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