The most common treatment for yeast infections is a one-, three-, or seven-day course of antifungal medicines called azoles, which are in medications such as Monistat. “The over-the-counter treatments work well for the most common yeast [that causes infections], Candida albicans,” Linda Eckert, M.D., professor in the Women's Health Division of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Washington, tells SELF. However, she notes that other strains of yeast can also cause yeast infections, and Candida albicans has developed some resistance to azoles. As such, sometimes longer treatment is necessary, like a course of treatment that lasts 14 days.
Martinez, R. C. R., Franceschini, S. A., Patta, M. C., Quintana, S. M., Candido, R. C., Ferreira, J. C., . . . Reid, G. (2009, March). Improved treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis with fluconazole plus probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14. Letters in Applied Microbiology, 48(3), 269–274. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1472-765X.2008.02477.x/full
What you need to know about a yeast infection A fungal infection of the genitals can affect anyone. Caused by the yeast species Candida albicans, symptoms include itching, irritation, and burning. A yeast infection can be complicated or uncomplicated, and treatment depends on the type. Find out about diagnosis and how to reduce the risk of developing an infection. Read now
Well, I can't say that I really know all that much about this specific diaper rash/ yeast inf. because I haven't dealt w/ it with my son at all. What I CAN say is that if you yourself were to get a yeast infection in your vagina and you used the over the counter 3 day medication (for example) and it didn't clear up and you did it again and again... its obviously not working. Most likely your doc would prescribe Diflucan or whatever to zap the infection a diff. way. I would definitely recommend you call your pediatrician and let them know your not comfortable continuing to use a product that isn't working on your child and to recommend something else.
Try to evaluate what kind of rash it is. My daughter had a rash that lasted a month without improving until we figured out it was a yeast-rash. There are descriptions in many of the parenting books. Essentially, a yeast rash has small satelite pimple spots and can only be treated with an antifungal (like jock-itch) cream - unless you can really air out baby. Once we started this, it cleared right up. Freyja
Yeast infections can occur in all age groups, from the very young to the very old. In babies, the most common ailments caused by yeast are diaper rash and a type of fungal infection in the mouth and throat called oral thrush. Rarely, a baby can develop a more serious yeast infection in the bloodstream or other organs. Symptoms depend on the type of infection and range from mild, local irritation to life-threatening illness in rare cases.
Short-course vaginal therapy. Antifungal medications are available as creams, ointments, tablets and suppositories. An antifungal regimen that lasts one, three or seven days will usually clear a yeast infection. A number of medications have been shown to be effective, including butoconazole (Gynazole-1), clotrimazole (Gyne-Lotrimin), miconazole (Monistat 3), and terconazole (Terazol 3). Some of these are available by prescription only, while others are available over-the-counter. Side effects might include slight burning or irritation during application. You may need to use an alternative form of birth control. Because the suppositories and creams are oil-based, they could potentially weaken latex condoms and diaphragms.
Take antibiotics only when prescribed by your health care professional and never take them for more or less time than directed. In addition to destroying bacteria that cause illness, antibiotics kill off the "good" bacteria that normally live in the vagina. Stopping treatment early, even when symptoms have improved, can cause infections to return and make them resistant to the medication.
A vaginal yeast infection is a common and uncomfortable problem that most women will experience at least once. It needs to be diagnosed by your doctor to rule out other causes of the symptoms, but it can usually be effectively treated with an over-the-counter product. For severe or frequent yeast infections, your doctor may prescribe a single-dose medication instead. There are many lifestyle changes you can make to help speed the clearing of an infection and prevent a recurrence.

But yeast in the vagina can sometimes "overgrow" and lead to symptoms of a yeast infection. Stress, pregnancy, and illnesses that affect the immune system may allow yeast to multiply. So can certain medicines, including some birth control pills and steroids. If you're taking antibiotics, such as for strep throat, the antibiotics can kill the "good" bacteria that normally keep the Candida in check. Yeast also can grow a lot if a girl's blood sugar is high. Girls who have diabetes that isn't controlled are more likely to get yeast infections.

References: 1. ISSVD. (2016). Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (Candida, Yeast): Tips for Diagnosis and Treatment (Version 1.0) [Mobile application software]. Retrieved from http://itunes.apple.com. 2. Richter SS, et al. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species causing vulvovaginitis and epidemiology of recurrent cases. J Clin Microbiol. 2005;43(5):2155-2162. 3. Mølgaard-Nielsen D, Svanström H, Melbye M, Hviid A, Pasternak B. Association between use of oral fluconazole during pregnancy and risk of spontaneous abortion and stillbirth. JAMA. 2016;315(1):58-67. 4. Lowes R. Low-dose fluconazole in pregnancy worries FDA. Available at: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862447. Published April 26, 2016. Accessed August 26, 2017. 5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vulvovaginal candidiasis. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/candidiasis.htm. Updated June 4, 2015. Accessed August 26, 2017. 6. May M, Schindler C. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs. Ther Adv Endocrinol Metab. 2016;7(2):69-83. 7. Diflucan [prescribing information]. New York, NY: Roerig; 2013. 8. Goswami D, Goswami R, Banerjee U, et al. Pattern of Candida species isolated from patients with diabetes mellitus and vulvovaginal candidiasis and their response to single dose oral fluconazole therapy. J Infect. 2006;52(2):111-117. 9. Nyirjesy P, Sobel JD. Genital mycotic infections in patients with diabetes. Postgrad Med. 2015;125(3):33-46.

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