A laboratory test is usually needed to diagnose vaginal candidiasis because the symptoms are similar to those of other types of vaginal infections. A healthcare provider will usually diagnose vaginal candidiasis by taking a small sample of vaginal discharge to be examined under a microscope or sent to a laboratory for a fungal culture. However, a positive fungal culture does not always mean that Candida is causing the symptoms because some women can have Candida in the vagina without having any symptoms.
In women, yeast infections are the second most common reason for vaginal burning, itching, and discharge. Yeast are found in the vagina of 20% to 50% of healthy women and can overgrow if the environment in the vagina changes. Antibiotic and steroid use is the most common reason for yeast overgrowth. However, pregnancy, menstruation, diabetes, and birth control pills also can contribute to getting a yeast infection. Yeast infections are more common after menopause
Some dermatologists and pediatric infectious disease specialists point out that the effectiveness of these topical creams has been waning over the last few years. An alternative oral medication (fluconazole [Diflucan]) taken once a day for two weeks can be very effective. Many pediatricians will initially recommend one of the topical medications for ease and simplicity and use fluconazole if topical treatment is not effective.
Vaginal yeast infection is often seen as a side effect of cancer treatment. Your white blood cells, which normally keep the yeast usually found in your vagina and digestive tract from overgrowing, can be reduced by chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Steroid drugs can also reduce your immune system's ability to maintain balance. High-dose antibiotics sometimes used in cancer treatment can also give way to a yeast infection.
You’ve been potty trained since you were a toddler, but if you find yourself avoiding using the bathroom because it hurts to pee, you’ve likely got a much more adult problem. Pain during urination is one of the signs of not only yeast infections but also urinary tract infections and some sexually transmitted diseases. If this is your main symptom, get it checked by your doctor asap, she says.
The most telltale sign of a yeast infection is thick, white, odor-free vaginal discharge, which is often described as looking like cottage cheese. It may or may not be accompanied by watery discharge as well. Sounds confusing? This is why it’s so important to know what’s normal for you and your vag. Some women naturally have more vaginal fluids than others so if yours changes suddenly—in color, amount, or odor—it’s time to get it checked out, Ghodsi says.

Yeast infections are caused by an imbalance in the vaginal flora (the natural bacteria in the vagina), and things that can cause that imbalance are changes in diet, medications you may be taking that wipe out natural bacteria in the vagina (like antibiotics), or other illnesses like diabetes and autoimmune disorders that raise your risk for infection. The most common antibiotics that tend to lead to a yeast infection are those used to treat urinary tract infections, though McHugh said that's likely because doctors just prescribe those antibiotics to women more often.


Candidiasis is a fungal infection due to any type of Candida (a type of yeast).[2] When it affects the mouth, it is commonly called thrush.[2] Signs and symptoms include white patches on the tongue or other areas of the mouth and throat.[3] Other symptoms may include soreness and problems swallowing.[3] When it affects the vagina, it is commonly called a yeast infection.[2] Signs and symptoms include genital itching, burning, and sometimes a white "cottage cheese-like" discharge from the vagina.[8] Yeast infections of the penis are less common and typically present with an itchy rash.[8] Very rarely, yeast infections may become invasive, spreading to other parts of the body.[9] This may result in fevers along with other symptoms depending on the parts involved.[9]
In today’s age of unpredictable waiting rooms and swamped doctors, online services like PlushCare save you time and stress. All our visits with patients are confidential and convenient and require as little as a phone or video consultation. This can be especially helpful for addressing personal health problems, especially when they are of a sensitive nature.
The MONISTAT® 7 suite of products is the original prescription formula (100 mg of miconazole nitrate per dose), with smaller doses of the active ingredient evenly distributed throughout the week at bedtime. MONISTAT® 7 meets CDC Treatment Guidelines for pregnant women and is appropriate for women with diabetes. (Consult a healthcare professional before use.) Use as directed.
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