Yeast infections are caused by an imbalance in the vaginal flora (the natural bacteria in the vagina), and things that can cause that imbalance are changes in diet, medications you may be taking that wipe out natural bacteria in the vagina (like antibiotics), or other illnesses like diabetes and autoimmune disorders that raise your risk for infection. The most common antibiotics that tend to lead to a yeast infection are those used to treat urinary tract infections, though McHugh said that's likely because doctors just prescribe those antibiotics to women more often.
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Thrush is usually whitish oral, velvety lesions that appear on the tongue and mouth. Underneath the whitish material lies the red tissue which bleeds easily. The size and number of lesions can increase slowly in untreated cases. Thrush may be widespread (to involve large parts of tongue, mouth’s roof and inside of cheeks) and may mimic oral ulcers. These white patches cannot be rubbed off like bits of milk.

Aside from the discomfort of persistent itching, you can’t assume that a yeast infection will simply go away. “Untreated yeast infections can lead to long-term vaginal irritation and discomfort,” says Dr. Quimper. A yeast infection is likely not dangerous, she says, but that “yeast infection” might also be something else, like a sexually transmitted infection, that could cause bigger problems. Here are healthy secrets your vagina wants to tell you.


Candida organisms naturally live on the skin, but breakdown of the outer layers of skin promote the yeast's overgrowth. This typically occurs when the environment is warm and moist such as in diaper areas and skin folds. Superficial candida skin infections appear as a red flat rash with sharp scalloped edges. There are usually smaller patches of similar appearing rash nearby, known as "satellite lesions." These rashes may cause itching or pain.

Some people find soaking in an apple cider vinegar bath offers relief, as the vinegar can help restore normal acidity to the vagina. Add two cups of vinegar to a shallow warm—not hot—bath, and soak for 15 minutes. Make sure you dry yourself thoroughly before getting dressed. Every body is different, but most women will see some improvement after two or three soaks.
To treat vaginal yeast infections and thrush, a mother has several options. Dr. William Sears says the nursing mother can safely treat her yeast infection in the traditional manner by using over-the-counter yeast infection creams or the prescription drug Diflucan. Sears says it's important, though, to treat the nipples if it appears that the yeast has spread to the nipples. Over-the-counter treatments such as clotrimazole (Lotrimin or Mycelex) or miconazole (Mycatin or Monistat-Derm) can be applied to the nipples after feedings two to four times a day. Use until the symptoms have cleared up for two days. These medications are safe to take while nursing and don't affect a woman's ability to breastfeed.
When a mother has a vaginal yeast infection that also infects the nipples in the form of thrush, oftentimes, the baby needs to be treated as well. Treatment for an affected baby is similar to that for the mother. Oral liquid prescription treatments such as Clotrimazole, Miconazole and Fluconazole have been shown to be effective in infant doses. In addition, Genetian violet may be a helpful over-the-counter remedy.
“[My son] got yeast right off the bat because I had antibiotics after delivery. It totally sucks! I feel your pain. At the time, I just used some Monistat (at the pediatrician's recommendation). He also had oral thrush, so he was on Nystatin. I've since learned that the magical cure is to mix Monistat, Maalox and a barrier cream (I used A+D). I just used that on it, and it cleared things mostly up within a day and completely within three.”
During my pregnancy, I developed terribly uncomfortable vaginal yeast symptoms that just about drove me crazy. I knew it was a yeast infection, but since I was pregnant, I just didn't want to do anything I shouldn't. So I went for a quick check, and my midwife sent me right off to get some over-the-counter cream. She told me that even though I'd been right about my diagnosis, I'd done the right thing to see her first. Sometimes it isn't what you think it is, and you never know what medicines are safe when you're pregnant.
Probiotics are "good" bacteria that help regulate "bad" bacteria and fungus, such as yeast, inside the body. Yogurt contains lactobacilli, a healthy bacteria. When an infant is old enough to eat soft foods, a caregiver can offer a small serving of yogurt on a daily basis to help restore the infant's vaginal flora. The flora is the normal bacteria and fungal balance in the vagina. Ask a health care provider about using a probiotic drink or powder with an infant. These are available at health food stores and some pharmacies but the dosing amount should be determined by a qualified health care provider.
Well, I can't say that I really know all that much about this specific diaper rash/ yeast inf. because I haven't dealt w/ it with my son at all. What I CAN say is that if you yourself were to get a yeast infection in your vagina and you used the over the counter 3 day medication (for example) and it didn't clear up and you did it again and again... its obviously not working. Most likely your doc would prescribe Diflucan or whatever to zap the infection a diff. way. I would definitely recommend you call your pediatrician and let them know your not comfortable continuing to use a product that isn't working on your child and to recommend something else.

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Aside from sex with a partner who has a yeast infection, several other risk factors can increase your odds of developing a penile yeast infection. Being uncircumcised is a major risk factor, as the area under the foreskin can be a breeding ground for candida. If you don’t bathe regularly or properly clean your genitals, you also put yourself at risk.
Three out of four women will experience at least one yeast infection in their lifetimes. If you’ve had one, you know the signs: severe vaginal itching and irritation accompanied by a thick, white discharge. Sometimes you might feel a burning sensation during urination or sex. Yeast infections certainly aren’t pleasant, but under most circumstances, they’re easy to treat.
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The healthy vaginal ecosystem requires just the right balance of bacteria flora. The vaginal mucosa, which protects against pathogens, is made up predominantly of healthy bacteria called lactobacillus. These bacteria make hydrogen peroxide, which keeps unhealthy bacteria from getting out of hand. This, in turn, keeps the amount of yeast at a normal level. Too much douching can disrupt the bacterial balance and lead to infection.

A yeast infection, also known as candida vulvovaginitis, is a common infection that 3 out of every 4 women will experience throughout their lives. Yeast infections are not considered Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs). They can develop for a variety of reasons. Yeast infections most commonly refer to vaginal infections, but can also occur in other places in your body, such as your mouth or armpits. For our purposes, we’ll stick to vaginal yeast infections (though men can get yeast infections too).


A health care provider will use a cotton swab to take a sample of your vaginal discharge. The sample is put on a slide along with a drop of a special liquid. Your health care provider or a person working in a lab will then look at the sample under a microscope to see if you have an overgrowth of yeast. There are other office based tests for evaluating vaginal discharge. Your health care provider may also do a culture of the discharge, particularly if you have had yeast infections that keep coming back.
Because yeast can be present normally in the vagina of healthy women, not all yeast infections can be prevented. However, it is possible to take preventive measures that may reduce your risk of getting a yeast infection. These include always cleaning the genital area from front to back and changing out of wet bathing suits or damp clothes as soon as possible. Wearing loose-fitting cotton underwear can help reduce moisture and prevent yeast infections. Since chemical irritants can influence the balance of bacteria in the vagina, avoiding products with potential irritants like douches or scented tampons can also help. Regular baths or showers are an adequate way to cleanse the vagina, and douching is not recommended and may actually increase your risk of yeast infection.
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