Candida is a fungus that aids with nutrient absorption and digestion when in proper levels in the body. When it overproduces, typical candida symptoms may appear. In the digestive tract, if left unchecked, it breaks down the walls of the intestinal lining and penetrates into the bloodstream. This releases byproduct toxins and other toxins from your system, causing leaky gut syndrome.

A yeast infection commonly appears in the skin folds where it is warm and moist. Other common names are a fungal infection or Candida albicans. It usually presents as a swollen red rash with white scales and lesions. They may also appear as small white pus-filled lesions surrounded by redness. In addition to the skin folds, lesions may be found on nearby skin outside the diaper area, such as the thighs or abdomen. These are called satellite lesions, and are usually a common sign of the yeast infection.


You can treat a yeast infection with over-the-counter antifungal medications (creams, ointments, or suppositories for your vagina), or your doctor may opt to give you a prescription for a one-day oral antifungal like fluconazole. Changing up habits to ones that support vaginal health—like staying away from tight clothing, using an unscented body wash, changing pads and tampons often, and changing out of workout clothes after exercise—can help lessen the aggravation of symptoms or decrease the likelihood of recurrence, Dr. Atashroo says.

The OTC products available for vaginal yeast infections typically have one of four active ingredients: butoconazole nitrate, clotrimazole, miconazole, and tioconazole. These drugs are in the same anti-fungal family and work in similar ways to break down the cell wall of the Candida organism until it dissolves. These products are safe to use if you are pregnant.


Anti‐fungals are available for oral and intra‐vaginal treatment of uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (thrush). The primary objective of this review was to assess the relative effectiveness of oral versus intra‐vaginal anti‐fungals for the treatment of uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis. The secondary objectives of the review were to assess the cost‐effectiveness, safety and patient preference of oral versus intra‐vaginal anti‐fungals. No statistically significant differences were observed in clinical cure rates of anti‐fungals administered by the oral and intra‐vaginal routes for the treatment of uncomplicated vaginal candidiasis. No definitive conclusion can be made regarding the relative safety of oral and intra‐vaginal anti‐fungals for uncomplicated vaginal candidiasis. The decision to prescribe or recommend the purchase of an anti‐fungal for oral or intra‐vaginal administration should take into consideration: safety, cost and treatment preference. Unless there is a previous history of adverse reaction to one route of administration or contraindications, women who are purchasing their own treatment should be given full information about the characteristics and costs of treatment to make their own decision. If health services are paying the treatment cost, decision‐makers should consider whether the higher cost of some oral anti‐fungals is worth the gain in convenience, if this is the patient's preference.

Some dermatologists and pediatric infectious disease specialists point out that the effectiveness of these topical creams has been waning over the last few years. An alternative oral medication (fluconazole [Diflucan]) taken once a day for two weeks can be very effective. Many pediatricians will initially recommend one of the topical medications for ease and simplicity and use fluconazole if topical treatment is not effective.
It goes without saying that the need to wear a diaper is probably the major contributing factor. Cotton underwear is much better suited to breathing and preventing the environment in which yeast thrive -- dark, warm, and moist skin surfaces. Cloth diapers and nonabsorbent disposable diapers both contribute to a favorable environment for yeast growth. Many specialists believe that a yeast infection in the infant's mouth (thrush) is a risk factor for the development of yeast diaper dermatitis. Lastly, recent receipt of oral antibiotics may also encourage overgrowth of intestinal yeast.
Vaginal yeast infection is often seen as a side effect of cancer treatment. Your white blood cells, which normally keep the yeast usually found in your vagina and digestive tract from overgrowing, can be reduced by chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Steroid drugs can also reduce your immune system's ability to maintain balance. High-dose antibiotics sometimes used in cancer treatment can also give way to a yeast infection.
As McHugh mentioned, some women get stuck in a hellish cycle of constant yeast infections and bacterial vaginosis — treating BV causes a yeast infection which causes BV and so on and so forth. This isn't something you're just doomed to live with forever. McHugh said if this is happening to you, you should see an ob-gyn or pelvic health specialist. Both to rule out any other underlying issue, and see if there's another way to treat either issue to break the cycle.
Is it legit? Yes, although this is a pretty outdated treatment. “Vaginal boric acid capsules have been used for decades in combatting chronic yeast infections,” Dr. Ross says, thanks to its antifungal properties. One review published in the Journal of Women’s Health found that boric acid supplements were safe and effective in curing anywhere from 40 to 100 percent of vaginal yeast infections, which is a pretty big range. “This is not usually a first line treatment of health care providers,” Dr. Wider stresses.
You're especially susceptible to vaginal yeast infections if you have diabetes. Yeast cells that normally live in the vagina are kept in careful check by the minimally available nutrients in the acidic environment of the vagina. However, in women and girls with diabetes, vaginal secretions contain more glucose due to higher amounts of glucose in the blood. Yeast cells are nourished by this excess glucose, causing them to multiply and become a yeast infection.
It’s possible that eating one cup of yogurt (which contains acidophilus bacteria) a day is helpful in preventing yeast infections. However, eating yogurt alone will not cure or prevent vaginal yeast infections. If you have to take antibiotics and are getting lots of yeast infections, talk to your health care provider about using an anti-yeast cream or pill.
The probiotics, found in yogurt, can also help. The live bacteria is good bacteria and helps fight bad bacteria. Live bacteria yogurt is also fantastic applied DIRECTLY. Yup, smear yogurt on your baby's crotch. Sugar free and no fruit, obviously! Berries in the crotch aren't going to cure anything. My daughter's doctor told me not to keep up the yogurt when she pointed out the skin looked like it was drying out, meaning the yeast was going away. Yay!
Garlic is another buzzed about remedy, but again, the science hasn’t proven itself, and there are significant problems with people sticking whole cloves into their vaginal cavities. “Raw garlic is actually quite caustic,” Dr. Nathan says. On the other hand, no vampires? (Seriously, though, don’t do this. The Mayo Clinic recommends always seeing a doctor before you try any kind of alternative yeast infection treatment, because you don’t want to make things worse.)

A recurrent yeast infection occurs when a woman has four or more infections in one year that are not related to antibiotic use. Recurrent yeast infections may be related to an underlying medical condition such as impaired immunity and may require more aggressive treatment. This can include longer courses of topical treatments, oral medications, or a combination of the two.


To treat vaginal yeast infections and thrush, a mother has several options. Dr. William Sears says the nursing mother can safely treat her yeast infection in the traditional manner by using over-the-counter yeast infection creams or the prescription drug Diflucan. Sears says it's important, though, to treat the nipples if it appears that the yeast has spread to the nipples. Over-the-counter treatments such as clotrimazole (Lotrimin or Mycelex) or miconazole (Mycatin or Monistat-Derm) can be applied to the nipples after feedings two to four times a day. Use until the symptoms have cleared up for two days. These medications are safe to take while nursing and don't affect a woman's ability to breastfeed.
The probiotics, found in yogurt, can also help. The live bacteria is good bacteria and helps fight bad bacteria. Live bacteria yogurt is also fantastic applied DIRECTLY. Yup, smear yogurt on your baby's crotch. Sugar free and no fruit, obviously! Berries in the crotch aren't going to cure anything. My daughter's doctor told me not to keep up the yogurt when she pointed out the skin looked like it was drying out, meaning the yeast was going away. Yay!
To diagnose your vaginal symptoms, your health care professional will perform a gynecological examination and check your vagina for inflammation and abnormal discharge. A sample of the vaginal discharge may be taken for laboratory examination under a microscope, or for a yeast culture, test to see if candida fungi grow under laboratory conditions. Looking under a microscope also helps rule out other causes of discharge such as BV or trichomoniasis, which require different treatment.

According to the Department of Clinical Research at Merck Research Laboratories, candidiasis can become invasive in cancer patients and present a serious complication. (3) In this study, one-third of patients being treated for cancer had “invasive” candidiasis. Chemotherapy and radiation can both work to kill cancerous cells and tumors; however, they also kill off the healthy bacteria that naturally fight candida.

The healthy vaginal ecosystem requires just the right balance of bacteria flora. The vaginal mucosa, which protects against pathogens, is made up predominantly of healthy bacteria called lactobacillus. These bacteria make hydrogen peroxide, which keeps unhealthy bacteria from getting out of hand. This, in turn, keeps the amount of yeast at a normal level. Too much douching can disrupt the bacterial balance and lead to infection.
Systemic candidiasis occurs when Candida yeast enters the bloodstream and may spread (becoming disseminated candidiasis) to other organs, including the central nervous system, kidneys, liver, bones, muscles, joints, spleen, or eyes. Treatment typically consists of oral or intravenous antifungal medications.[59] In candidal infections of the blood, intravenous fluconazole or an echinocandin such as caspofungin may be used.[15] Amphotericin B is another option.[15]
Another possibility: Your “yeast infection” is persisting because it’s actually a different condition, such as bacterial vaginosis or trichomoniasis. This is why it’s especially important to prioritize heading to the doctor ASAP if you’re pregnant and your self-treated yeast infection comes back. Some issues that can masquerade as yeast infections can be dangerous during pregnancy. For example, bacterial vaginosis can increase the risk of preterm labor, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Once you start using an OTC anti-fungal medication, your yeast infection symptoms will probably begin to disappear within a few days. As with antibiotics, though, it's extremely important to continue to use your medication for the entire number of days recommended. Even if your symptoms have gone away, the fungus may still be active enough to cause a relapse.
Your genital health can be a sensitive subject. You should only opt out of treatment if you have experienced a yeast infection before and are comfortable with your body’s response, or if your symptoms are very mild. Even in these cases, it is best to be cautious and ask your doctor about your yeast infection and how you should treat it. The sooner you know, the sooner you can get back to a healthy life.
Try to evaluate what kind of rash it is. My daughter had a rash that lasted a month without improving until we figured out it was a yeast-rash. There are descriptions in many of the parenting books. Essentially, a yeast rash has small satelite pimple spots and can only be treated with an antifungal (like jock-itch) cream - unless you can really air out baby. Once we started this, it cleared right up. Freyja
One of the most common symptoms is intense itchiness in both the vaginal opening and the vulva, so feeling like you constantly have to scratch is a solid indicator that something isn't right, Mason says. It doesn't help that fungus thrives in warm, moist environments (like your vagina), so it's important that you start treating a yeast infection right away before your symptoms get worse.
A yeast infection results from an overgrowth of yeast (a type of fungus) anywhere in the body. Candidiasis is by far the most common type of yeast infection. There are more than 20 species of Candida, the most common being Candida albicans. These fungi live on all surfaces of our bodies. Under certain conditions, they can become so numerous they cause infections, particularly in warm and moist areas. Examples of such infections are vaginal yeast infections, thrush (infection of tissues of the oral cavity), skin, including diaper rash, beneath large breasts, and nailbed infections.
Factors that increase the risk of candidiasis include HIV/AIDS, mononucleosis, cancer treatments, steroids, stress, antibiotic usage, diabetes, and nutrient deficiency. Hormone replacement therapy and infertility treatments may also be predisposing factors.[37] Treatment with antibiotics can lead to eliminating the yeast's natural competitors for resources in the oral and intestinal flora; thereby increasing the severity of the condition.[38] A weakened or undeveloped immune system or metabolic illnesses are significant predisposing factors of candidiasis.[39] Almost 15% of people with weakened immune systems develop a systemic illness caused by Candida species.[40] Diets high in simple carbohydrates have been found to affect rates of oral candidiases.[41]
Aside from the discomfort of persistent itching, you can’t assume that a yeast infection will simply go away. “Untreated yeast infections can lead to long-term vaginal irritation and discomfort,” says Dr. Quimper. A yeast infection is likely not dangerous, she says, but that “yeast infection” might also be something else, like a sexually transmitted infection, that could cause bigger problems. Here are healthy secrets your vagina wants to tell you.
To tell whether or not your baby’s white tongue is caused by milk or this kind of fungal infection, try to wipe it off gently using a soft, damp cloth or a gauze-covered finger. If the tongue is pink and healthy-looking after wiping, no further treatment is necessary. If the white patch doesn't come off very easily, or it does and you find a raw, red patch underneath, it's likely thrush, and you should contact your pediatrician.
Vagina or discharge smells like onions: What to do While a mild vaginal odor is healthy and all vaginas have a different smell, a strong scent of onions may indicate a problem. In this article, we explore the causes of a vagina that smells like onions. These include specific foods, bacterial vaginosis, and poor hygiene. We also cover treatment and prevention methods. Read now
Use of a boric acid suppository is accepted as a treatment for Candida species other than the most common one, Candida albicans, which responds well to the usual treatments. The boric acid is contained in a gelatin capsule, and you can get instructions on how to make your own using over-the-counter boric acid and a fillable size 0 or 00 gelatin capsule. You should be sure that you get medical advice on using this; 600 milligrams, once or twice daily for seven to 14 days is usually recommended. You should never take boric acid by mouth or use it on open wounds. It is not safe to use while pregnant. Even when used as recommended, you may have some skin irritation.
Antibiotic treatment. Babies exposed to antibiotic treatment (even if the nursing mother is consuming antibiotics) are more prone to develop yeast infection. The reason is that consumption of antibiotic kill good bacteria (besides the disease causing bacteria) present in body that keeps the excessive yeast growth in check. In the absence of good bacteria, yeast can grow excessively.
It's one of the more gag-worthy comparisons out there, but anyone who's experienced this yeast infection symptom firsthand knows it's accurate. "Generally, women will come in and complain of an odorless discharge — something that’s thick, whitish, and looks like cottage cheese," Mason says. Normal discharge is typically somewhere between clear and milky white, so you'll notice a distinct difference.
Some of the medicines used to treat yeast infections are available without a prescription, but you shouldn't just buy one if you think you have a yeast infection. It's important to see a doctor for your diagnosis because if you actually have another type of infection, it could get worse if not properly treated. Also, over-the-counter medicine should not be used by anyone younger than 12 or girls who might be pregnant without talking to a doctor first.

Breastfeeding doesn't have to be interrupted if one or both of you have been diagnosed with thrush, but the condition can make feeding excruciating for you — another reason why prompt treatment for both of you is needed. One thing that can help, provided you have the privacy and cooperative weather, is exposing your nipples to sunlight for a few minutes each day, since yeast hates sun. Probiotics may help speed recovery and keep yeast at bay too, and they're safe to take while you're breastfeeding.


Expert Working Group on Canadian Guidelines for Sexually Transmitted Infections (2014). Canadian guidelines on sexually transmitted infections: Supplementary statement for recommendations related to the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of vaginal discharge. Public Health Agency of Canada. http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/std-mts/sti-its/cgsti-ldcits/disc-pert-eng.php. Accessed May 22, 2015.

A yeast infection results from an overgrowth of yeast (a type of fungus) anywhere in the body. Candidiasis is by far the most common type of yeast infection. There are more than 20 species of Candida, the most common being Candida albicans. These fungi live on all surfaces of our bodies. Under certain conditions, they can become so numerous they cause infections, particularly in warm and moist areas. Examples of such infections are vaginal yeast infections, thrush (infection of tissues of the oral cavity), skin, including diaper rash, beneath large breasts, and nailbed infections.


Women with VVC usually experience genital itching, burning, and sometimes a "cottage cheese-like" vaginal discharge. Men with genital candidiasis may experience an itchy rash on the penis. The symptoms of VVC are similar to those of many other genital infections, so it is important to see your doctor if you have any of these symptoms...Read more about Genital Candidiasis Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
This is because vaginal infections caused by bacteria, as well as some sexually transmitted infections (STI), may have symptoms very similar to those caused by yeast, but they require different treatments. Since yeast infection treatments have become available over the counter (OTC), many women simply visit the closest drugstore and buy an antifungal cream.
×