Efforts to prevent infections of the mouth include the use of chlorhexidine mouth wash in those with poor immune function and washing out the mouth following the use of inhaled steroids.[5] Little evidence supports probiotics for either prevention or treatment even among those with frequent vaginal infections.[12][13] For infections of the mouth, treatment with topical clotrimazole or nystatin is usually effective.[5] By mouth or intravenous fluconazole, itraconazole, or amphotericin B may be used if these do not work.[5] A number of topical antifungal medications may be used for vaginal infections including clotrimazole.[14] In those with widespread disease, an echinocandin such as caspofungin or micafungin is used.[15] A number of weeks of intravenous amphotericin B may be used as an alternative.[15] In certain groups at very high risk, antifungal medications may be used preventatively.[11][15]
Is it legit? Sure. “Wearing breathable underwear has always been recommended in preventing yeast infections,” Dr. Ross says. “Any type of clothing, including bathing suits or exercise clothing, for extended periods of time can trap unwanted bacteria, chemicals, and sweat, disrupting the pH balance of the vagina and leading to a yeast infection.” Here’s the thing: This won’t cure a yeast infection—it may just help lower the odds you’ll develop one in the first place.
A recurrent yeast infection occurs when a woman has four or more infections in one year that are not related to antibiotic use. Recurrent yeast infections may be related to an underlying medical condition such as impaired immunity and may require more aggressive treatment. This can include longer courses of topical treatments, oral medications, or a combination of the two.
An overgrowth of candida albincans---the fungus responsible for yeast infections---can lead to vaginal yeast infections and also thrush in the breastfeeding mother. Found in the vagina, nipples, mouth and baby's diapered area, candida albicans thrives in moist, dark environments. Though candida albicans is always present in the body, illness, pregnancy or antibiotic use can cause an surplus of this yeast. When a nursing mother develops a yeast infection, chances are this infection will be present in other ares of the body, such as the nipples, which can lead to an infection in baby as well.

on diaper rash, i have LOVED country comfort baby cream... it works wonders on diaper rash, little scratches, etc. you can get it at whole foods and similar sorts of places. also, the usual info is helpful: exposure to sunlight, etc. if diaper rash is very bad, your baby may have developed thrush (a yeast infection) in the rash area... in which case you'll need to go to the doc for meds. good luck! cynthia
Respiratory, gastrointestinal, and esophageal candidiasis require an endoscopy to diagnose.[23][49] For gastrointestinal candidiasis, it is necessary to obtain a 3–5 milliliter sample of fluid from the duodenum for fungal culture.[23] The diagnosis of gastrointestinal candidiasis is based upon the culture containing in excess of 1,000 colony-forming units per milliliter.[23]
A dog’s ear canal plunges downward and then away from the ear opening (it is shaped like a “L”). That gives yeast a favorable environment in which to grow. If your dog swims or is bathed frequently, trapped water or debris in the ear canal can lead to yeast infections. Allergens like pollens, mold, dust, feathers, cigarette smoke, cleaning products, and certain foods can also lead to ear infections in a dog.
Remember: Do not use anti-yeast medications without seeing your health care provider, unless you’ve been diagnosed by an HCP more than once, so you’re really sure of the symptoms and signs. The medicine(s) that is prescribed for yeast infections will not cure other kinds of vaginal infections such as bacterial vaginosis or sexually transmitted infections (STIs). You would need another prescription medicine to treat the infection.
More than 20 types of Candida can cause infection with Candida albicans being the most common.[2] Infections of the mouth are most common among children less than one month old, the elderly, and those with weak immune systems.[4] Conditions that result in a weak immune system include HIV/AIDS, the medications used after organ transplantation, diabetes, and the use of corticosteroids.[4] Other risks include dentures and following antibiotic therapy.[4] Vaginal infections occur more commonly during pregnancy, in those with weak immune systems, and following antibiotic use.[10] Individuals at risk for invasive candidiasis include low birth weight babies, people recovering from surgery, people admitted to an intensive care units, and those with an otherwise compromised immune systems.[11]

A vaginal yeast infection, which is also sometimes called vulvovaginal candidiasis, happens when the healthy yeast that normally lives in your vagina grows out of control. It often leads to itching and other irritating symptoms. The medical name for a yeast infection is "candidiasis," because they’re usually caused by a type of yeast called candida.

×