Yeast infection is treated using antifungal drugs. Both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) remedies are available that are effective in treating vaginal yeast infections. Nonprescription drugs are the best home remedy for yeast infections, and they can cure most yeast infections. However, homeopathic methods have not been adequately studied for doctors and other health care professionals to recommend them, and anti-itch medications treat only the itching symptoms, but do not treat the underlying cause (yeast infection).
Once you start using an OTC anti-fungal medication, your yeast infection symptoms will probably begin to disappear within a few days. As with antibiotics, though, it's extremely important to continue to use your medication for the entire number of days recommended. Even if your symptoms have gone away, the fungus may still be active enough to cause a relapse.
Your vagina likes to be in balance. If you get an overgrowth of the fungus candida down there, you may get a yeast infection. It’s incredibly common—three-quarters of women will get saddled with one in their lifetime—but pregnancy, uncontrolled diabetes, hormonal birth control, douching or using other vaginal cleansing products, and taking antibiotics can make you more susceptible to them, according to the federal Office on Women’s Health.
Azole medications are a family of antifungal drugs that end in the suffix "-azole." They block the manufacture of ergosterol, a crucial material of the yeast cell wall. Without ergosterol, the yeast cell wall becomes leaky and the yeast die. Fortunately, ergosterol is not a component of human membranes, and azoles do not harm human cells. Examples include miconazole, tioconazole, clotrimazole, fluconazole, and butoconazole.
Once you start using an OTC anti-fungal medication, your yeast infection symptoms will probably begin to disappear within a few days. As with antibiotics, though, it's extremely important to continue to use your medication for the entire number of days recommended. Even if your symptoms have gone away, the fungus may still be active enough to cause a relapse.
Betamethasone dipropionate is a fluorinated high-potency topical corticosteroid that is formulated with clotrimazole in the brand-named product Lotrisone. This product is frequently used inappropriately in intertriginous (diaper regions where deep folds of skin overlap) areas. Such potent corticosteroids have no role in the treatment of a Candida diaper rash. The absorption of such a highly potent steroid may produce multiple (and potentially severe) side effects.
A Pap smear (Pap test) is a medical procedure to screen for abnormal cells of the cervix. A woman should have her first Pap smear (in general) three years after vaginal intercourse, or no later than 21 years of age. The risks for women at increased risk for having an abnormal Pap smear include: HPV (genital warts), smoking, a weakened immune system, medications (diethylstilbestrol), and others. Some of the conditions that may result in an abnormal Pap smear include: absence of endocervical cells, unreliable Pap smear due to inflammation, atypical squamous cells (ASCUS), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and carcinoma in situ.
The symptoms all boil down to this: Yeast can be irritating to the sensitive mucus membranes of your vagina and labia. That can cause burning, itching, and all of the other symptoms, Dr. Schaffir says. And, since the tissue in your vagina and labia becomes irritated and sore from a yeast infection, it can make sex and peeing painful, too. The unique discharge is caused by Candida, Dr. Wider says, but not every woman with a yeast infection experiences it.
The most common bacteria found in a healthy vagina are Lactobacillus acidophilus and help keep yeast levels in check. These bacteria moderate the growth of yeast cells and help susceptible parts of your body fight off infection. You will most likely notice when this balance is thrown off because overproduction of yeast can cause an array of uncomfortable symptoms further listed below, which indicate a yeast infection. Treatments for yeast infections are easy to access and use. While yeast infections may go away on their own, treatment is usually a preferable option, as the symptoms can be uncomfortable to deal with. Treatments for yeast infections are easy to access and use. By choosing not to treat your yeast infection, it may worsen and create a bigger problem.

Oral thrush is another common type of yeast infection that occurs frequently in babies, especially during the first 6 to 12 months of life. This yeast infection appears as white or yellowish patches in a baby’s mouth. They may appear on the tongue, gums, roof of the mouth or the inside of the cheeks. Patches caused by a yeast infection in the mouth cannot be wiped away easily, unlike formula or breast milk that may coat the tongue. With thrush, bleeding may occur if the patches are wiped off. A baby may experience some discomfort or difficulty eating as a result of oral thrush, leading to poor feeding or fussiness during feeding. An antifungal solution may be prescribed to treat oral thrush.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Erdogan A, Rao SS (April 2015). "Small intestinal fungal overgrowth". Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 17 (4): 16. doi:10.1007/s11894-015-0436-2. PMID 25786900. Small intestinal fungal overgrowth (SIFO) is characterized by the presence of excessive number of fungal organisms in the small intestine associated with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Candidiasis is known to cause GI symptoms particularly in immunocompromised patients or those receiving steroids or antibiotics. However, only recently, there is emerging literature that an overgrowth of fungus in the small intestine of non-immunocompromised subjects may cause unexplained GI symptoms. Two recent studies showed that 26 % (24/94) and 25.3 % (38/150) of a series of patients with unexplained GI symptoms had SIFO. The most common symptoms observed in these patients were belching, bloating, indigestion, nausea, diarrhea, and gas. The underlying mechanism(s) that predisposes to SIFO is unclear but small intestinal dysmotility and use of proton pump inhibitors has been implicated. However, further studies are needed; both to confirm these observations and to examine the clinical relevance of fungal overgrowth, both in healthy subjects and in patients with otherwise unexplained GI symptoms. ... For routine SIFO in an immunocompetent host, a 2–3 week oral course of fluconazole 100–200 mg will suffice.
Candida organisms naturally live on the skin, but breakdown of the outer layers of skin promote the yeast's overgrowth. This typically occurs when the environment is warm and moist such as in diaper areas and skin folds. Superficial candida skin infections appear as a red flat rash with sharp scalloped edges. There are usually smaller patches of similar appearing rash nearby, known as "satellite lesions." These rashes may cause itching or pain.
Candida albicans is the most common type of yeast infection found in the mouth, intestinal tract and vagina, and it may affect skin and other mucous membranes. If the immune system is functioning optimally, this type of yeast infection is rarely serious. However, if the immune system is not functioning properly, the candida infection can migrate to other areas of the body, including the blood and membranes around the heart or brain, causing serious candida symptoms. (1)

First and foremost, if you're a nursing mom, squirt that breast milk on baby's butt! Whether straight from the tap, or if you'd rather pump and get it on there some other way, those antibodies even help kill bacteria topically (great for ear infections, cuts, sinuses, all sorts of things!). I know it seems really super-weird, but I swear, it's helpful.
Your vagina likes to be in balance. If you get an overgrowth of the fungus candida down there, you may get a yeast infection. It’s incredibly common—three-quarters of women will get saddled with one in their lifetime—but pregnancy, uncontrolled diabetes, hormonal birth control, douching or using other vaginal cleansing products, and taking antibiotics can make you more susceptible to them, according to the federal Office on Women’s Health.
Take antibiotics only when prescribed by your health care professional and never for longer than directed. In addition to destroying bacteria that cause illness, antibiotics kill off the "good" bacteria that keep the yeast in the vagina at a normal level. If you tend to get yeast infections whenever you take an antibiotic, ask your doctor to prescribe a vaginal antifungal agent at the same time.

That said, you can still see a doctor for confirmation of your yeast infection even if you’ve had one diagnosed in the past. In general, people don’t seem to be particularly good at self-diagnosing their vaginal health issues. A 2010 study of 546 people published in Nursing Research found that study participants with yeast infections misdiagnosed themselves around 30 percent of the time, and those with bacterial vaginosis or the sexually transmitted infection trichomoniasis misdiagnosed themselves around 44 percent of the time. A lot of these conditions can share the same symptoms, so it’s not your fault if you can’t always tell them apart. So, if you’re at all unsure, see a doctor.
Contact your doctor as soon as possible if you think your baby has a yeast infection of any type. Seek immediate medical attention if your baby is having difficulty eating. Also contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical care if your baby has a fever or low body temperature, is drowsy or difficult to awaken, or experiences rapid, labored or irregular breathing.
Most diaper rashes have to do with impairment of skin integrity rather than any specific bacterial or fungal infection. Urine and stool acidity (the latter seen in diarrhea) and chronic wetness coupled with a warm barrier environment are all factors proposed as causes of diaper dermatitis (diaper rash). However, sometimes a superficial skin infection is a factor in diaper rash. The most common infectious cause of diaper rash is Candida albicans (yeast, a fungus).
It can be hard to tell if this is the problem because the patches in her mouth can be very small and the only symptom thrush nipples have had for me is that they get dry. She was prescribed nystatin suspension drops and I put Lotrimin on my nipples. We have been fighting thrush for a while, now, as it is VERY hard to get rid of. If my nipples are dry, I know that it has spread to me. You have to boil EVERYTHING that comes into contact with the baby's mouth. We use clothe diapers, and she hasn't gotten any more diaper rashes since I started using Lotrimin on her bum. I still don't know if we've gotten rid of the thrush, but we are still in treatment mode and I'm boiling everything AGAIN... Anonymous
If you have fatigue or exhaustion that you simply cannot shake, regardless of the number of hours you sleep, you may have chronic fatigue syndrome. The disease is characterized by fatigue that lasts a minimum of six months and is often accompanied by other candida symptoms, including headaches, joint pain, difficulties with memory and concentration, and sore throat. (5)
If you have a yeast infection, treatment of sexual partners is usually not generally recommended, since it's not clear if vaginal yeast infections are transmitted sexually. However, if a woman has recurrent infections and her male sex partner shows symptoms of candida balanitis—redness, irritation and/or itching at the tip of the penis—he may need to be treated with an antifungal cream or ointment.

Many girls find that yeast infections tend to show up right before they get their periods because of the hormonal changes that come with the menstrual cycle. Clothing (especially underwear) that's tight or made of materials like nylon that trap heat and moisture might make yeast infections more likely. Using scented sanitary products and douching can upset the healthy balance of bacteria in the vagina and make yeast infections more likely.
Take antibiotics only when prescribed by your health care professional and never take them for more or less time than directed. In addition to destroying bacteria that cause illness, antibiotics kill off the "good" bacteria that normally live in the vagina. Stopping treatment early, even when symptoms have improved, can cause infections to return and make them resistant to the medication.
Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.
×