^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Martins N, Ferreira IC, Barros L, Silva S, Henriques M (June 2014). "Candidiasis: predisposing factors, prevention, diagnosis and alternative treatment". Mycopathologia. 177 (5–6): 223–240. doi:10.1007/s11046-014-9749-1. hdl:10198/10147. PMID 24789109. Candida species and other microorganisms are involved in this complicated fungal infection, but Candida albicans continues to be the most prevalent. In the past two decades, it has been observed an abnormal overgrowth in the gastrointestinal, urinary and respiratory tracts, not only in immunocompromised patients but also related to nosocomial infections and even in healthy individuals. There is a wide variety of causal factors that contribute to yeast infection which means that candidiasis is a good example of a multifactorial syndrome.

What's to know about diabetes and yeast infections? Yeast infections can cause pain, a burning sensation, and unpleasant discharge. Diabetes can reduce the acidity of the infected area, leading to yeast overgrowth. How are diabetes and yeast infections linked? What are the symptoms of a yeast infection, how is it diagnosed, and what are the treatments? Read now
Systemic candidiasis occurs when Candida yeast enters the bloodstream and may spread (becoming disseminated candidiasis) to other organs, including the central nervous system, kidneys, liver, bones, muscles, joints, spleen, or eyes. Treatment typically consists of oral or intravenous antifungal medications.[59] In candidal infections of the blood, intravenous fluconazole or an echinocandin such as caspofungin may be used.[15] Amphotericin B is another option.[15]

A health care provider will use a cotton swab to take a sample of your vaginal discharge. The sample is put on a slide along with a drop of a special liquid. Your health care provider or a person working in a lab will then look at the sample under a microscope to see if you have an overgrowth of yeast. There are other office based tests for evaluating vaginal discharge. Your health care provider may also do a culture of the discharge, particularly if you have had yeast infections that keep coming back.

Your pediatrician will often make the diagnosis by examining your child and her symptoms. Scrapings of Candida lesions inside the mouth or elsewhere can be examined under the microscope for signs of the infection. An ultrasound or CT scan can detect candidal lesions that have developed in the brain, kidney, liver, or spleen. Cultures of the blood or mouth lesions are taken to grow the fungus in the laboratory and identify the type and sensitivity of the yeast.
Another thing that is a major godsend is coconut oil. Yeah, the same kind you use in cooking. Honestly, I don't even buy diaper rash products because coconut oil trumps them all. It's good as lotion for the family (and the oily feeling disappears in a minute or two, unlike with other oils), it smells good, and it's totally safe if baby puts his lotioned hands in his mouth. Tasty, makes skin soft, helps diaper rashes, healthy, and kills yeast! It's ALMOST as cool as breast milk ... almost. If baby is old enough to eat solids, mixing a little coconut oil in with some (low sugar!) food can help, too.

You may be trying to treat an infection that is not a yeast infection. Studies show that two out of three women who buy yeast infection medicine don't really have a yeast infection.2 Instead, they may have an STI or bacterial vaginosis (BV). STIs and BV require different treatments than yeast infections and, if left untreated, can cause serious health problems.
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