The most common bacteria found in a healthy vagina are Lactobacillus acidophilus and help keep yeast levels in check. These bacteria moderate the growth of yeast cells and help susceptible parts of your body fight off infection. You will most likely notice when this balance is thrown off because overproduction of yeast can cause an array of uncomfortable symptoms further listed below, which indicate a yeast infection. Treatments for yeast infections are easy to access and use. While yeast infections may go away on their own, treatment is usually a preferable option, as the symptoms can be uncomfortable to deal with. Treatments for yeast infections are easy to access and use. By choosing not to treat your yeast infection, it may worsen and create a bigger problem.

What you need to know about fungal infections Some fungi occur naturally in the body, and they can be helpful or harmful. An infection occurs when an invasive fungus becomes too much for the immune system to handle. We describe the most common types, including yeast infection, jock itch, and ringworm. Here, learn about risk factors and the range of treatments. Read now

A laboratory test is usually needed to diagnose vaginal candidiasis because the symptoms are similar to those of other types of vaginal infections. A healthcare provider will usually diagnose vaginal candidiasis by taking a small sample of vaginal discharge to be examined under a microscope or sent to a laboratory for a fungal culture. However, a positive fungal culture does not always mean that Candida is causing the symptoms because some women can have Candida in the vagina without having any symptoms.
Imidazoles are best but pregnant women may need longer (7 not 4 day) courses. Thrush is a common vaginal infection in pregnancy causing itching and soreness. There is no evidence that this yeast infection harms the baby. Antifungal creams are effective. Imidazoles (such as clotrimazole) are more effective than older treatments such as nystatin and hydrargaphen. Longer courses (7 days) cured more than 90% of women whereas standard (4 day) courses only cured about half the cases.
Let’s say you’ve had a diagnosed yeast infection in the past, you self-treated a recent one in the last month or two, and it seems like the infection didn’t go away—or it went away but now it’s back. That might mean the treatment simply masked the symptoms rather than eradicating the overgrowth completely. “If your symptoms aren't better and they don't stay better, then you really have to go in and get checked,” Dr. Eckert says.

The health of the vagina relies on beneficial probiotic bacteria (lactobacilli, including L. acidophilus) to maintain a slightly acidic pH and keep yeast from overgrowing. Some suggest that women consume probiotics naturally found in yogurt or kefir, take probiotic supplements, or apply probiotic products vaginally (as appropriate), either to help relieve yeast infection symptoms or prevent recurrent yeast infections.
A sexy romp should leave you feeling a little flushed afterward, but if you feel a painful heat in your vagina during sex, it could signal a bigger problem. A burning sensation during intercourse, or a constant burning feeling in your vaginal area at any time, is a telltale sign of a yeast infection, Ghodsi says. This symptom isn’t one you should ignore as it could also be a sign of an STI or bacterial infection, so call your doctor right away, she adds.

The genus Candida and species C. albicans were described by botanist Christine Marie Berkhout in her doctoral thesis at the University of Utrecht in 1923. Over the years, the classification of the genera and species has evolved. Obsolete names for this genus include Mycotorula and Torulopsis. The species has also been known in the past as Monilia albicans and Oidium albicans. The current classification is nomen conservandum, which means the name is authorized for use by the International Botanical Congress (IBC).[68]

Individuals who treat their asthma with corticosteroid inhalants are at an increased risk of developing candida in the mouth, leading to systemic candida overgrowth. (2) It is imperative that individuals using corticosteroid inhalers for asthma follow the directions for swishing the mouth out after each use. If oral candidiasis is detected, it can be treated with the gargling of coconut oil and a drop or two of essential clove oil.

Up to 40% of women seek alternatives to treat vaginal yeast infection.[27] Example products are herbal preparations, probiotics and vaginal acidifying agents.[27] Other alternative treatment approaches include switching contraceptive, treatment of the sexual partner and gentian violet.[27] However, the effectiveness of such treatments has not received much study.[27]
A thick cottage cheese-like vaginal discharge, which may smell like yeast. A fishy odor is a symptom of BV, not of a yeast infection. The vagina normally produces a discharge that is usually described as clear or slightly cloudy, non-irritating, and having a mild odor. There may also be no discharge with a yeast infection or a discharge that is thin and watery.
A systemic yeast infection refers to invasion into the bloodstream with subsequent spread throughout the body. This type of yeast infection is very rare in babies, typically occurring only in those who have existing health problems. Infants who are born prematurely or with a low birth weight, have a weakened immune system or who are already hospitalized for another reason are at increased risk. Other risk factors include bladder catheterization and long-term antibiotic or chemotherapy treatment. Signs and symptoms may include a low or high temperature, poor feeding, irregular breathing and low blood pressure. Although rare, systemic yeast infections are very serious. They are a major cause of death in settings such as the neonatal intensive care unit, according to a March 2011 article in "Early Human Development."
Some women get yeast infections every month around the time of their menstrual periods. Your health care provider may tell you that you need to take medicine every month to prevent yeast infections. This is done to stop the symptoms from developing, or if you get a lot of infections you may be told that you need to take oral pills for up to 6 months. Never self-treat unless you’ve talked to your health care provider.
Symptoms in men may include itching, burning, and pain at the tip of the penis. Discomfort during urination can also occur. The area may appear reddened or irritated. Symptoms may resemble those of other diseases, including some sexually-transmitted infections (STDs), so testing should always be carried out to determine the cause of symptoms in men.
Antibiotics & Stomach Cramps in a Baby Recurring Yeast Infections in Toddlers Nystatin Side Effects for Infants Baby Yeast Rash Remedies How to Tell If You Need a Probiotic Top-Rated Probiotics for Children How to Choose a Good Probiotic Probiotics & Acid Reflux in Infants Can a Pregnant Woman Take Acidophilus Pills? Activia Yogurt and Antibiotics Azithromycin & Probiotics Are Probiotics Safe for Newborns? How Quickly Should Prune Juice Work for Relief of Infant Constipation? Infant Side Effects From Amoxicillin Which Is Best for Baby: Prebiotics or Probiotics? Can People on a Dairy-Free Diet Take Probiotics? Probiotic Overdose Can Probiotics Cause Stomach Pain? Yogurt & Eczema Probiotic Dosage After Antibiotics

You're especially susceptible to vaginal yeast infections if you have diabetes. Yeast cells that normally live in the vagina are kept in careful check by the minimally available nutrients in the acidic environment of the vagina. However, in women and girls with diabetes, vaginal secretions contain more glucose due to higher amounts of glucose in the blood. Yeast cells are nourished by this excess glucose, causing them to multiply and become a yeast infection.
C. albicans was isolated from the vaginas of 19% of apparently healthy women, i.e., those who experienced few or no symptoms of infection. External use of detergents or douches or internal disturbances (hormonal or physiological) can perturb the normal vaginal flora, consisting of lactic acid bacteria, such as lactobacilli, and result in an overgrowth of Candida cells, causing symptoms of infection, such as local inflammation.[42] Pregnancy and the use of oral contraceptives have been reported as risk factors.[43] Diabetes mellitus and the use of antibiotics are also linked to increased rates of yeast infections.[43]
You may not need to take your baby to the doctor in order to treat yeast diaper rash. In many cases, such infections can be cleared up with the simple application of some over-the-counter topical treatments. Three easy-to-find anti-fungal creams are Mycostatin (nystatin), Lotrimin (clotrimazole), and Monistat-Derm (miconazole micatin). Ask your pediatrician if she has a preference if you aren't sure which to use. 
Garlic was shown in a lab study to be an effective Candida killer. But there is some debate over whether it will help cure yeast infections outside of a lab setting. If you’d like to try garlic to treat a yeast infection, add more garlic to your diet. Some websites recommend inserting garlic in the vagina, but burns and significant pain have been reported.

A small percentage of women (less than 5 percent) experience recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC), defined as four or more yeast infections per year. Treatment involves a longer course of treatment—between 7 and 14 days of a topical cream or suppository or oral fluconazole followed by a second and third dose three and six days later. Your health care professional may also recommend a preventative treatment after the infection has resolved. This treatment may involve a 150 mg dose of fluconazole or 500 mg of topical clotrimazole once a week.

Vaginal yeast infection is often seen as a side effect of cancer treatment. Your white blood cells, which normally keep the yeast usually found in your vagina and digestive tract from overgrowing, can be reduced by chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Steroid drugs can also reduce your immune system's ability to maintain balance. High-dose antibiotics sometimes used in cancer treatment can also give way to a yeast infection.
Women with VVC usually experience genital itching, burning, and sometimes a "cottage cheese-like" vaginal discharge. Men with genital candidiasis may experience an itchy rash on the penis. The symptoms of VVC are similar to those of many other genital infections, so it is important to see your doctor if you have any of these symptoms...Read more about Genital Candidiasis Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Antibiotics & Stomach Cramps in a Baby Recurring Yeast Infections in Toddlers Nystatin Side Effects for Infants Baby Yeast Rash Remedies How to Tell If You Need a Probiotic Top-Rated Probiotics for Children How to Choose a Good Probiotic Probiotics & Acid Reflux in Infants Can a Pregnant Woman Take Acidophilus Pills? Activia Yogurt and Antibiotics Azithromycin & Probiotics Are Probiotics Safe for Newborns? How Quickly Should Prune Juice Work for Relief of Infant Constipation? Infant Side Effects From Amoxicillin Which Is Best for Baby: Prebiotics or Probiotics? Can People on a Dairy-Free Diet Take Probiotics? Probiotic Overdose Can Probiotics Cause Stomach Pain? Yogurt & Eczema Probiotic Dosage After Antibiotics
First, women who are pregnant or have diabetes or HIV have a higher risk of developing a yeast infection. Second, and most important, these woman, as well as nursing mothers, should always see their health care professional if they suspect a yeast infection rather than self-treat because yeast medications may interfere with medications needed for their other health problems (HIV, diabetes) or pose risks for the baby.
Vaginal infections can also be caused by bacterial vaginosis (BV), the most common cause of vaginitis in women of childbearing age, and trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted infection. BV and trichomoniasis are associated with more serious reproductive health concerns, such as premature birth and increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases. Because these infections can have symptoms similar to those of yeast infections, yet can have more serious reproductive effects, it's important to see a health care professional to evaluate and diagnose any vaginal symptoms. A variety of medications can treat vaginal infections, but proper diagnosis is key.
“If you've been clinically diagnosed by a physician with a yeast infection on ... prior occasions, and the symptoms that you have are consistent with the symptoms that you had before, I do think that it's reasonable to try some of these over-the-counter remedies,” Chantel Cross, M.D., assistant professor of gynecology and obstetrics at Johns Hopkins Medicine, tells SELF.

The health condition is so, err, popular because every woman naturally has yeast (aka candida) brewing in their vaginas. But sometimes an overgrowth can occur, and that's when problems pop up. "Anything that can throw off the environment of your vagina can cause yeast infections, whether it's medication, excess moisture, condoms, IUDs, or even tampons," says Angelique Mason, a family nurse practitioner at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia. Other common causes: Douching, using vaginal products that have fragrance chemicals, hanging out in wet or sweaty clothing and swimsuits, and wearing underwear that's too tight.
Shino, B., Peedikayil, F. C., Jaiprakash, S. R., Bijapur, G. A., Kottayi, S., & Jose, D. (2016, February 25). Comparison of antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine, coconut oil, probiotics, and ketoconazole on Candida albicans isolated in children with early childhood caries: An in vitro study [Abstract]. Scientifica, 7061587. Retrieved from https://www.hindawi.com/journals/scientifica/2016/7061587/abs/
The primary treatment for Candida diaper rash involves antifungal topical treatment and decreasing moisture in the diaper area. Nystatin (Mycostatin), clotrimazole (Lotrimin), and miconazole (Micatin, Monistat-Derm) are topical over-the-counter (nonprescription) treatments of equal strength for treating Candida diaper dermatitis. Occasionally, other prescription antifungal creams, such as ketoconazole (Nizoral cream) and econazole (Spectazole) may be necessary. How long treatment should last has not been completely defined, although typically the cream or ointment is applied at each diaper change until the rash is resolved, usually in four to seven days.
The fungus candida causes a vaginal yeast infection. Your vagina naturally contains a balanced mix of yeast, including candida, and bacteria. Lactobacillus bacteria produce acid, which prevents yeast overgrowth. That balance can be disrupted and lead to a yeast infection. Too much yeast in your vagina causes vaginal itching, burning and other classic signs and symptoms of a yeast infection.

The health condition is so, err, popular because every woman naturally has yeast (aka candida) brewing in their vaginas. But sometimes an overgrowth can occur, and that's when problems pop up. "Anything that can throw off the environment of your vagina can cause yeast infections, whether it's medication, excess moisture, condoms, IUDs, or even tampons," says Angelique Mason, a family nurse practitioner at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia. Other common causes: Douching, using vaginal products that have fragrance chemicals, hanging out in wet or sweaty clothing and swimsuits, and wearing underwear that's too tight.

Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. The One Medical Group entities and 1Life Healthcare, Inc. make no representations or warranties and expressly disclaim any and all liability concerning any treatment, action by, or effect on any person following the general information offered or provided within or through the blog, website, or app. If you have specific concerns or a situation arises in which you require medical advice, you should consult with an appropriately trained and qualified medical services provider.


The most common treatment for yeast infections is a one-, three-, or seven-day course of antifungal medicines called azoles, which are in medications such as Monistat. “The over-the-counter treatments work well for the most common yeast [that causes infections], Candida albicans,” Linda Eckert, M.D., professor in the Women's Health Division of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Washington, tells SELF. However, she notes that other strains of yeast can also cause yeast infections, and Candida albicans has developed some resistance to azoles. As such, sometimes longer treatment is necessary, like a course of treatment that lasts 14 days.

Infant yeast infection should be treated with a topical antifungal medicine such as nystatin four times a day. There are combination antifungal/steroid creams available, but the risk is that overusing steroid cream on sensitive private parts or the face can lead to a thinning out of the skin permanently, with what are called "atrophic changes." It's worth avoiding, and if you can get away with no steroid but just antifungal medicines for yeast infections, that is safer for Junior's bottom.


Yeast infections are treated with a pill that you swallow, or with a vaginal cream or vaginal suppository (a partially solid material that you insert into your vagina, where it dissolves and releases medicine). Your health care provider will explain to you what your choices are and if one is better than another for you. The pill is especially good if you don’t want to put cream inside of your vagina. Some anti-yeast vaginal creams are sold over-the-counter (without a prescription) in pharmacies. Other anti-yeast vaginal creams need a prescription. If you use a cream, then you should not use tampons during the treatment since it will absorb the medication and make it less effective.
What you need to know about a yeast infection A fungal infection of the genitals can affect anyone. Caused by the yeast species Candida albicans, symptoms include itching, irritation, and burning. A yeast infection can be complicated or uncomplicated, and treatment depends on the type. Find out about diagnosis and how to reduce the risk of developing an infection. Read now
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