My baby had a terrible yeast infection in his mouth and his diaper area when he was about 7 months old. The doctor gave us some medication for his mouth that we applied religiously 3x a day for a couple of weeks. The symptoms would abate only to return full force a day later. Finally, someone suggested giving him yogurt. We did so and both the mouth infection and diaper rash went away within a couple of days, never to return (that was over 3 months ago). Hope this helps. ST

If your baby has thrush in the diaper area, you need can use the cream (topical treatment). But you need to also use the oral Nystatin suspension. If you don't use the oral suspension, the thrush will often come back. The yeast is in the gut and so comes out with your baby's poop (poo) - if you don't treat from the top end, you won't get cure the thrush.

If this is your first yeast infection, you may have to go see your gynecologist. “Patients will call and say, ‘I’m not sure what’s wrong; can you diagnose me?’ But it’s difficult to make a diagnosis over the phone unless a patient has a documented pattern of recurrent yeast infections,” Dr. Atashroo says. Find out the 10 foods you should eat for a healthier vagina.


You can ask your physician for a prescription for Diflucan (fluconazole) if you'd prefer taking a single oral dose of medication over using a vaginal cream or suppository. The drug is appropriate for uncomplicated cases and had only mild to moderate side effects—including headache, dizziness, diarrhea, heartburn, and stomach pain—in clinical trials. However, oral fluconazole should not be taken if you are pregnant, as it can cause birth defects.
Yeast infections are usually caused by an overgrowth of a type of fungus called Candida, also known as yeast. Small amounts of yeast and other organisms are normally found in your vagina, as well as in your mouth and digestive tract. Yeast infections occur when the balance of organisms in your vagina is upset, and the amount of yeast grows too much, causing an infection. Yeast infections are most likely to be noticeable just before or just after your menstrual period. Some types of “yeast” infections are harder to treat and are caused by other species. Ask your health care provider (HCP) if you should be checked for the other types if your symptoms do not get better.
The other thing I would suggest is to let him/her run around naked to air out 'the buns' a few times a day. Yes I know the possibilities of messiness are endless, but if possible try that and maybe just getting some air down there would help. Something else too- are you breastfeeding? If so, try expressing some milk and dripping it on there before you put on the diaper. I'm not kidding- breastmilk is great stuff! Have you tried cloth diapers? Sometimes the disposable ones don't 'breathe' enough and can make rashes worse.... Good Luck! SK
A small percentage of women (less than 5 percent) develop recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC), defined as four or more symptomatic vaginal yeast infections during a 12-month period. Although RVVC is more common in women who have diabetes or problems with their immune system, most women with RVVC have no underlying medical illness that would predispose them to recurrent candida infections.
An infant can develop a vaginal yeast infection from an overgrowth of the fungi that thrive naturally in and on the body. Oral thrush, a yeast infection of the mouth, can lead to vaginal yeast infection when the fungi is passed through the feces and makes contact with the vagina. Caregivers should confer with a health care provider before attempting treatment of an infant yeast infection.
Hi, My 11 month daughter is usually free of diaper rash. But she got diaper rash two months ago. We tried the usual diaper rash cream and it did not help. We then went to see her pediatrician who diagnosized it as yeast infection and prescribed a NYSTOP powder (which is a MYCOSTATIN powder). We kept using it for one week and it was under control. However it never went away. Now more than a month passed and we still have to apply the powder every day three times a day (although the prescription says for one week) and the red patches are still there. We also tried Lotrimin AF which also helped but didn't clear it up. We tried to switch back to diaper creame or use cornstarch powder and they made it worse. I am concerned about the continuous usage of the anti-fungal powder. Is there any alternative we can try? Yi
Typically, yeast infection discharge doesn’t have an odor to it. It’s bacterial vaginosis (BV), another common vaginal infection, that does—and it may be “fishy.” But here’s the catch: “Some patients will have a yeast infection and BV at the same time,” Dr. Atashroo says. So your discharge may very well smell “off.” If you treat a yeast infection at home and it doesn’t get better, you need an evaluation to see if you have another (or entirely different) infection, she says. Find out the 8 silent signs of cervical cancer.
Regarding a yeast-like rash in your child--forgive me, I did not see the original post, so please get confirmation from a competent pediatrician or dermatologist that what your dealing with is not ''vaginal strep.'' VS can parade like yeast but is treated wholly differently. And, yes, VS occurs in the toddler girl population. Good luck; I know the condition unchecked can be uncomfortab Physician Mama

You can ask your physician for a prescription for Diflucan (fluconazole) if you'd prefer taking a single oral dose of medication over using a vaginal cream or suppository. The drug is appropriate for uncomplicated cases and had only mild to moderate side effects—including headache, dizziness, diarrhea, heartburn, and stomach pain—in clinical trials. However, oral fluconazole should not be taken if you are pregnant, as it can cause birth defects.
You're especially susceptible to vaginal yeast infections if you have diabetes. Yeast cells that normally live in the vagina are kept in careful check by the minimally available nutrients in the acidic environment of the vagina. However, in women and girls with diabetes, vaginal secretions contain more glucose due to higher amounts of glucose in the blood. Yeast cells are nourished by this excess glucose, causing them to multiply and become a yeast infection.

Probiotics are "good" bacteria that help regulate "bad" bacteria and fungus, such as yeast, inside the body. Yogurt contains lactobacilli, a healthy bacteria. When an infant is old enough to eat soft foods, a caregiver can offer a small serving of yogurt on a daily basis to help restore the infant's vaginal flora. The flora is the normal bacteria and fungal balance in the vagina. Ask a health care provider about using a probiotic drink or powder with an infant. These are available at health food stores and some pharmacies but the dosing amount should be determined by a qualified health care provider.
When my son had oral yeast (thrush) and several weeks of Nystatin did nothing for it, we used Gentian Violet, which is cheap ($3/bottle) and available at most drug stores, and it cured him in two days. You only need a drop or two. If your daughter's diaper rash is indeed yeast (which it might not be), perhaps Gentian Violet would help. Note that it stains everything it touches bright purple, so be prepared with some clothes you don't care about! Purple and Yeast-Free

In today’s age of unpredictable waiting rooms and swamped doctors, online services like PlushCare save you time and stress. All our visits with patients are confidential and convenient and require as little as a phone or video consultation. This can be especially helpful for addressing personal health problems, especially when they are of a sensitive nature.
Your pediatrician will often make the diagnosis by examining your child and her symptoms. Scrapings of Candida lesions inside the mouth or elsewhere can be examined under the microscope for signs of the infection. An ultrasound or CT scan can detect candidal lesions that have developed in the brain, kidney, liver, or spleen. Cultures of the blood or mouth lesions are taken to grow the fungus in the laboratory and identify the type and sensitivity of the yeast.

References: 1. ISSVD. (2016). Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (Candida, Yeast): Tips for Diagnosis and Treatment (Version 1.0) [Mobile application software]. Retrieved from http://itunes.apple.com. 2. Richter SS, et al. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species causing vulvovaginitis and epidemiology of recurrent cases. J Clin Microbiol. 2005;43(5):2155-2162. 3. Mølgaard-Nielsen D, Svanström H, Melbye M, Hviid A, Pasternak B. Association between use of oral fluconazole during pregnancy and risk of spontaneous abortion and stillbirth. JAMA. 2016;315(1):58-67. 4. Lowes R. Low-dose fluconazole in pregnancy worries FDA. Available at: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862447. Published April 26, 2016. Accessed August 26, 2017. 5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vulvovaginal candidiasis. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/candidiasis.htm. Updated June 4, 2015. Accessed August 26, 2017. 6. May M, Schindler C. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs. Ther Adv Endocrinol Metab. 2016;7(2):69-83. 7. Diflucan [prescribing information]. New York, NY: Roerig; 2013. 8. Goswami D, Goswami R, Banerjee U, et al. Pattern of Candida species isolated from patients with diabetes mellitus and vulvovaginal candidiasis and their response to single dose oral fluconazole therapy. J Infect. 2006;52(2):111-117. 9. Nyirjesy P, Sobel JD. Genital mycotic infections in patients with diabetes. Postgrad Med. 2015;125(3):33-46.
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