A type of fungus called Candida commonly causes yeast infections in babies. These infections most often occur when the skin's barrier defenses fail, allowing Candida that normally lives on the skin's surface invade the superficial skin tissue. Yeast thrives in warm, moist areas. Candida infection is a common cause of diaper rash, especially in association with diarrhea. Frequent drooling makes the area around the mouth and under the chin susceptible to yeast infections. Candida skin infections typically appear as bright red patches, often with surrounding red bumps called satellite lesions. The rash is typically most prominent in the skin creases. Candida rashes are often painful, and infants with diaper rash may be fussy, especially around changing time. Diaper rashes and similar skin infections caused by yeast are usually easily treated with antifungal creams and ointments.
Diagnosis of a yeast infection is done either via microscopic examination or culturing. For identification by light microscopy, a scraping or swab of the affected area is placed on a microscope slide. A single drop of 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution is then added to the specimen. The KOH dissolves the skin cells, but leaves the Candida cells intact, permitting visualization of pseudohyphae and budding yeast cells typical of many Candida species.
Vaginal yeast infection, also known as candidal vulvovaginitis and vaginal thrush, is excessive growth of yeast in the vagina that results in irritation.[5][1] The most common symptom is vaginal itching, which may be severe.[1] Other symptoms include burning with urination, white and thick vaginal discharge that typically does not smell bad, pain with sex, and redness around the vagina.[1] Symptoms often worsen just before a woman's period.[2]
Some people worry that using actual yeast infection medications will further upset the microbial balance in the vagina, leading to more discomfort. But Leena Nathan, M.D., an ob/gyn at UCLA Health, says this concern isn’t necessary because these drugs are only affecting your yeast overgrowth. “It's OK to go ahead and treat it and not worry about trading one [infection] for another,” she tells SELF. You might experience side effects such as a bit of burning or irritation, and if you choose vaginal suppositories they could weaken the latex in condoms (so use a different form of contraception if necessary)—but antifungals aren’t going to somehow create a different vaginal infection.
Your genital health can be a sensitive subject. You should only opt out of treatment if you have experienced a yeast infection before and are comfortable with your body’s response, or if your symptoms are very mild. Even in these cases, it is best to be cautious and ask your doctor about your yeast infection and how you should treat it. The sooner you know, the sooner you can get back to a healthy life.

The most telltale sign of a yeast infection is thick, white, odor-free vaginal discharge, which is often described as looking like cottage cheese. It may or may not be accompanied by watery discharge as well. Sounds confusing? This is why it’s so important to know what’s normal for you and your vag. Some women naturally have more vaginal fluids than others so if yours changes suddenly—in color, amount, or odor—it’s time to get it checked out, Ghodsi says.
Researchers believe that certain methods of birth control may be to blame for recurrent yeast infections. Spermicidal jellies and creams increase a woman's susceptibility to infection by altering vaginal flora, allowing candida (yeast microorganisms) to take firmer hold. It seems that the estrogen in oral contraceptives causes the vagina to produce more glycogen (sugar), which feeds the yeast. Vaginal sponges and intrauterine devices (IUDs) may also make you more prone to infection, and diaphragms are thought to promote colonization of candida.

Some people worry that using actual yeast infection medications will further upset the microbial balance in the vagina, leading to more discomfort. But Leena Nathan, M.D., an ob/gyn at UCLA Health, says this concern isn’t necessary because these drugs are only affecting your yeast overgrowth. “It's OK to go ahead and treat it and not worry about trading one [infection] for another,” she tells SELF. You might experience side effects such as a bit of burning or irritation, and if you choose vaginal suppositories they could weaken the latex in condoms (so use a different form of contraception if necessary)—but antifungals aren’t going to somehow create a different vaginal infection.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Martins N, Ferreira IC, Barros L, Silva S, Henriques M (June 2014). "Candidiasis: predisposing factors, prevention, diagnosis and alternative treatment". Mycopathologia. 177 (5–6): 223–240. doi:10.1007/s11046-014-9749-1. hdl:10198/10147. PMID 24789109. Candida species and other microorganisms are involved in this complicated fungal infection, but Candida albicans continues to be the most prevalent. In the past two decades, it has been observed an abnormal overgrowth in the gastrointestinal, urinary and respiratory tracts, not only in immunocompromised patients but also related to nosocomial infections and even in healthy individuals. There is a wide variety of causal factors that contribute to yeast infection which means that candidiasis is a good example of a multifactorial syndrome.
There are several approaches that will be helpful in eradicating and preventing a yeast infection in the diaper area. Air exposure (no diapers) of the skin region is invaluable. The backyard is often a site where the child can be without diapers. The establishment of toilet training is also very helpful. As the child is developmentally ready, the transition from diaper to cotton underwear is beneficial. If diapers are needed, utilizing an absorbent disposable product is superior to either cloth or nonabsorbent disposable diapers. Keeping the diaper area skin clean by rapid diaper changing as indicated is also helpful. Lastly, application of a topical preventative barrier cream such as petroleum jelly (Vaseline) or zinc oxide (A+D Ointment) are helpful preventive measures.
Your vagina likes to be in balance. If you get an overgrowth of the fungus candida down there, you may get a yeast infection. It’s incredibly common—three-quarters of women will get saddled with one in their lifetime—but pregnancy, uncontrolled diabetes, hormonal birth control, douching or using other vaginal cleansing products, and taking antibiotics can make you more susceptible to them, according to the federal Office on Women’s Health.
Maintenance plan. For recurrent yeast infections, your doctor might recommend a medication routine to prevent yeast overgrowth and future infections. Maintenance therapy starts after a yeast infection is cleared with treatment. You may need a longer treatment of up to 14 days to clear the yeast infection before beginning maintenance therapy. Therapies may include a regimen of oral fluconazole tablets once a week for six months. Some doctors prescribe clotrimazole as a vaginal suppository used once a week instead of an oral medication.
Let’s say you’ve had a diagnosed yeast infection in the past, you self-treated a recent one in the last month or two, and it seems like the infection didn’t go away—or it went away but now it’s back. That might mean the treatment simply masked the symptoms rather than eradicating the overgrowth completely. “If your symptoms aren't better and they don't stay better, then you really have to go in and get checked,” Dr. Eckert says.
The fungus candida causes a vaginal yeast infection. Your vagina naturally contains a balanced mix of yeast, including candida, and bacteria. Lactobacillus bacteria produce acid, which prevents yeast overgrowth. That balance can be disrupted and lead to a yeast infection. Too much yeast in your vagina causes vaginal itching, burning and other classic signs and symptoms of a yeast infection.
Jump up ^ Mendling W, Brasch J (2012). "Guideline vulvovaginal candidosis (2010) of the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics, the Working Group for Infections and Infectimmunology in Gynecology and Obstetrics, the German Society of Dermatology, the Board of German Dermatologists and the German Speaking Mycological Society". Mycoses. 55 Suppl 3: 1–13. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0507.2012.02185.x. PMID 22519657.
In addition to symptoms of vaginal yeast infections, such as burning or itching at the labia, a woman may experience sudden nipple pain that lasts through the feeding, or itchy or burning nipples with a candida albicus overgrowth that has also infected the nipples in the form of thrush. Affected nipples may look red, shiny, flaky or even have small blisters. "The Breastfeeding Answer Book" advises to watch for traces of white fungus in the folds of the nipple or breast, or cracked nipples. An infected breast-fed baby may also have white patches on his gums, cheeks, palate or tongue. Also, diaper rash, gassiness or general fussiness are all signs of thrush and that the yeast has spread to the baby.
There are plenty of reasons why having a vagina can be great. It can lead to some pretty pleasurable experiences (hey, hey, G-spot orgasms, if that’s a thing your body can do). And, obviously, it often comes with that whole miracle-of-life potential. But there are downsides, too. Enter the dreaded yeast infection: You’re going about your business and suddenly your underwear is covered in a sticky, white residue, or you’re having sex and realize it’s not so much hot as it is burning.
No matter what you do, or what you feed them, sometimes babies get diaper rashes. One of the more painful types is a yeast infection rash. We've all got yeast in our bodies, but just like many things, sometimes normal processes get out of whack and create issues. Yeast rashes suck and make big red patches with lots of spots. It spreads out into folds and looks painful (and often is). Yeast infections can happen to boys as well. Your pediatrician might tell you to go to the lady's section at the store and grab some of the same cream you'd use if you had the dreaded yeast infection, but there are a lot of other natural, tried-and-true ways to help treat it at home without meds.
Antibiotics are one of the most common culprits in causing yeast infections, because they destroy vaginal bacteria and thereby disrupt the balance of power among the vaginal microorganisms. This balance is also affected by hormone levels, so women are more prone to yeast infections if they’re using hormonal contraceptives, during pregnancy, or just prior to menstruation. Yeast infections are also more common in women with compromised immune systems due to illnesses like diabetes, AIDS, or cancer. In fact, anything that weakens your immune system—stress, lack of sleep, consumption of alcohol, and even refined sugar—can lead to an overgrowth of yeast.
You can treat a yeast infection with over-the-counter antifungal medications (creams, ointments, or suppositories for your vagina), or your doctor may opt to give you a prescription for a one-day oral antifungal like fluconazole. Changing up habits to ones that support vaginal health—like staying away from tight clothing, using an unscented body wash, changing pads and tampons often, and changing out of workout clothes after exercise—can help lessen the aggravation of symptoms or decrease the likelihood of recurrence, Dr. Atashroo says.
Try it: You can generally buy these online or at your local pharmacy. Like OTC vaginal yeast infection medications, you simply insert them vaginally, often for 14 days in a row, Dr. Ross says. This “has been an effective alternative to traditional medication,” she adds. However, it’s worth pointing out that these suppositories can irritate your skin.
If you are using a vaginal cream or suppository for treatment, refrain from using tampons, as they can block or remove the medication. Opt for a deodorant-free pad or liner if menstruating or just to protect your clothes from leakage, and change it often to prevent additional moisture build-up. Douching is never advised and it is especially to be avoided while you clearing a yeast infection.
Most women are bothered at one time or another by vaginitis -- the itching, burning, pain, and discharge that comes with a vaginal yeast infection. Yeast infections can be caused by a number of organisms, many of which inhabit the healthy vagina. One of the most common causes of vaginitis is the fungus Candida albicans. The annoying symptoms can include itching, discharge that has a "baked bread" odor, and reddening of the labia and, in some cases, the upper thigh.
A yeast diaper rash is a common  rash that develops on the bums of babies and young toddlers. “It’s very normal in infants and toddlers,” says Natasha Burgert, MD, FAAP, pediatrician at Pediatrics Associates in Kansas City, Missouri. “Yeast is a fungus that lives on your skin and in the intestines, and when you have a warm, moist environment in the diaper area, it can cause a bit of a rash.”
What you need to know about fungal infections Some fungi occur naturally in the body, and they can be helpful or harmful. An infection occurs when an invasive fungus becomes too much for the immune system to handle. We describe the most common types, including yeast infection, jock itch, and ringworm. Here, learn about risk factors and the range of treatments. Read now
Burning while urinating can be an excruciating experience. Luckily, it’s less common among yeast infection symptoms, but it’s still something that patients may notice, says Megan Quimper, MD, an ob-gyn at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Urine can aggravate already raw, irritated tissues. Burning is a common symptom of a urinary tract infection, which also includes a persistent urge to go and cloudy urine, according to the Mayo Clinic. Talk to your doctor about what may be going on with you and brush up on these 9 symptoms of a UTI.
The genus Candida and species C. albicans were described by botanist Christine Marie Berkhout in her doctoral thesis at the University of Utrecht in 1923. Over the years, the classification of the genera and species has evolved. Obsolete names for this genus include Mycotorula and Torulopsis. The species has also been known in the past as Monilia albicans and Oidium albicans. The current classification is nomen conservandum, which means the name is authorized for use by the International Botanical Congress (IBC).[68]
When my son had oral yeast (thrush) and several weeks of Nystatin did nothing for it, we used Gentian Violet, which is cheap ($3/bottle) and available at most drug stores, and it cured him in two days. You only need a drop or two. If your daughter's diaper rash is indeed yeast (which it might not be), perhaps Gentian Violet would help. Note that it stains everything it touches bright purple, so be prepared with some clothes you don't care about! Purple and Yeast-Free
Oral candidiasis is called thrush. Thick, white lacy patches on top of a red base can form on the tongue, palate, or elsewhere inside the mouth. These patches sometimes look like milk curds but cannot be wiped away as easily as milk can. If the white plaques are wiped away with a blade or cotton-tipped applicator, the underlying tissue may bleed. This infection also may make the tongue look red without the white coating. Thrush can be painful and make it difficult to eat. Care should be given to make sure a person with thrush does not become dehydrated. Thrush was formerly referred to as moniliasis, based upon an older name for Candid albicans (Monilia).
Vaginal infections can also be caused by bacterial vaginosis (BV), the most common cause of vaginitis in women of childbearing age, and trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted infection. BV and trichomoniasis are associated with more serious reproductive health concerns, such as premature birth and increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases. Because these infections can have symptoms similar to those of yeast infections, yet can have more serious reproductive effects, it's important to see a health care professional to evaluate and diagnose any vaginal symptoms. A variety of medications can treat vaginal infections, but proper diagnosis is key.

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Factors that increase the risk of candidiasis include HIV/AIDS, mononucleosis, cancer treatments, steroids, stress, antibiotic usage, diabetes, and nutrient deficiency. Hormone replacement therapy and infertility treatments may also be predisposing factors.[37] Treatment with antibiotics can lead to eliminating the yeast's natural competitors for resources in the oral and intestinal flora; thereby increasing the severity of the condition.[38] A weakened or undeveloped immune system or metabolic illnesses are significant predisposing factors of candidiasis.[39] Almost 15% of people with weakened immune systems develop a systemic illness caused by Candida species.[40] Diets high in simple carbohydrates have been found to affect rates of oral candidiases.[41]
Moist diaper environment. Yeast occurs as a natural commensal on the body of humans (which is harmless in most cases unless the growth of yeast exceeds the normal range). Typically fungus thrives in wet and warm places such as bowels, vagina, skin and mouth. If a child has diaper rash (which is left untreated) then it can easily trigger yeast infection, regardless of the gender of baby. Moist diaper environment is perfect breeding ground for yeast infection.
First and foremost, if you're a nursing mom, squirt that breast milk on baby's butt! Whether straight from the tap, or if you'd rather pump and get it on there some other way, those antibodies even help kill bacteria topically (great for ear infections, cuts, sinuses, all sorts of things!). I know it seems really super-weird, but I swear, it's helpful.

Your doctor or nurse can also give you a single dose of antifungal medicine taken by mouth, such as fluconazole (floo-CON-uh-zohl). If you get more than four vaginal yeast infections a year, or if your yeast infection doesn't go away after using over-the-counter treatment, you may need to take regular doses of antifungal medicine for up to six months.
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